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TITLE
Fred MacAulay on Future of Gaelic (2 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_FREDMACAULAY_16
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Fred MacAulay
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1634
KEYWORDS
Outer Hebrides
broadcasting
audio

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Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about the future of Gaelic.

'The other happy things that one looks at - the bilingual scheme in the Western Isles and the Western Isles Council itself - and what they've done over the last few years, though I think they've been backsliding a bit I would say. And then you've got a Gaelic publishing firm; you've got a Gaelic policy from the main political parties, however much it may be lip service, at least they have actually stated something. You still haven't got - with due apologies to Donald Stewart - a Gaelic-speaking member in the House of Commons, but one can always hope. On the other side - the doubtful side - you've got a falling population, the - taking the BBC and commercial again - the tremendous effect of television in particular, and radio too, newspapers and so on, the whole media, you see, is English orientated so that the youngsters growing in the Outer Hebrides are tending to be English speaking rather than Gaelic and I think that is one of the things that one has to say at this stage. So you weight the two things up and it's very difficult to say where you're going at this, but you have some tremendously exciting things. Others that I haven't mentioned; the poetry side, the short story, I would say is on a par with anything that Europe produces so you've got this element of writing which is quite exciting. And then you've got music - a tremendous range of it - and creative range going on and not, in fact, least, I was going to say, which would be totally the wrong way to say it, in fact. Supreme, I would say, is Runrig, and the way that they are creating music which is part of my being, and yet it's music very much of the present day and of the future'

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Fred MacAulay on Future of Gaelic (2 of 2)

1980s

Outer Hebrides; broadcasting; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Fred MacAulay

Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about the future of Gaelic.<br /> <br /> 'The other happy things that one looks at - the bilingual scheme in the Western Isles and the Western Isles Council itself - and what they've done over the last few years, though I think they've been backsliding a bit I would say. And then you've got a Gaelic publishing firm; you've got a Gaelic policy from the main political parties, however much it may be lip service, at least they have actually stated something. You still haven't got - with due apologies to Donald Stewart - a Gaelic-speaking member in the House of Commons, but one can always hope. On the other side - the doubtful side - you've got a falling population, the - taking the BBC and commercial again - the tremendous effect of television in particular, and radio too, newspapers and so on, the whole media, you see, is English orientated so that the youngsters growing in the Outer Hebrides are tending to be English speaking rather than Gaelic and I think that is one of the things that one has to say at this stage. So you weight the two things up and it's very difficult to say where you're going at this, but you have some tremendously exciting things. Others that I haven't mentioned; the poetry side, the short story, I would say is on a par with anything that Europe produces so you've got this element of writing which is quite exciting. And then you've got music - a tremendous range of it - and creative range going on and not, in fact, least, I was going to say, which would be totally the wrong way to say it, in fact. Supreme, I would say, is Runrig, and the way that they are creating music which is part of my being, and yet it's music very much of the present day and of the future'