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TITLE
Grant Family's Association with Whisky (1 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_01
PLACENAME
Ballindalloch
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George S. Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1635
KEYWORDS
distillers
distilleries
Grants of Glenfarclas
audio

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George S. Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the Grant family's association with whisky.

The family's association with whisky - it goes back to 1865 on a legal side, and presumably long before that on the consumption side.

Interviewer: Before that time, where did people distill whisky? Was it out on the moors, or was it near their home, or - ?

Slightly before my time Sam, I would say in their back kitchen, so to speak, as a cottage industry.

Interviewer: Are there any records remaining that can show how your family's association with the legal whisky business began?

The records we have go back to about 1830 or 1840 when great-grandfather Grant kept a diary recording what he was doing, mainly selling cattle and trading on his farm.

Interviewer: How did he become associated with distilling?

Well, he was brought up in Glenlivet and he farmed on Blairfindy Farm which was just round the corner from Glenlivet Distillery. Presumably he was a good customer or - maybe legal or illegal, I wouldn't know - but he was a farmer, and when Glenfarclas fell vacant in 1865 I think it was, he decided to take the lease as a convenient stopping place for driving his beasts to and from Elgin to the marts and what have you, put his son down there to take over the farm so to speak. Hence the association with Glenfarclas

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Grant Family's Association with Whisky (1 of 2)

1980s

distillers; distilleries; Grants of Glenfarclas; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

George S. Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the Grant family's association with whisky.<br /> <br /> The family's association with whisky - it goes back to 1865 on a legal side, and presumably long before that on the consumption side. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Before that time, where did people distill whisky? Was it out on the moors, or was it near their home, or - ?<br /> <br /> Slightly before my time Sam, I would say in their back kitchen, so to speak, as a cottage industry.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Are there any records remaining that can show how your family's association with the legal whisky business began?<br /> <br /> The records we have go back to about 1830 or 1840 when great-grandfather Grant kept a diary recording what he was doing, mainly selling cattle and trading on his farm.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How did he become associated with distilling?<br /> <br /> Well, he was brought up in Glenlivet and he farmed on Blairfindy Farm which was just round the corner from Glenlivet Distillery. Presumably he was a good customer or - maybe legal or illegal, I wouldn't know - but he was a farmer, and when Glenfarclas fell vacant in 1865 I think it was, he decided to take the lease as a convenient stopping place for driving his beasts to and from Elgin to the marts and what have you, put his son down there to take over the farm so to speak. Hence the association with Glenfarclas