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TITLE
George Grant on Blended Whisky
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_05
PLACENAME
Ballindalloch
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George S. Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1639
KEYWORDS
distillers
distilleries
Grants of Glenfarclas
audio

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George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the origins of blended whisky.

Interviewer: The other thing you mentioned was blending. Did that suddenly come up on the market, do you know, George, or did somebody hit upon this as a solitary finding?

I - it's like all innovations or things that happen like this. Presumably several publicans had started doing it at the same time - buying whisky from different distillers - and then presumably buying grain whisky and mixing the two together and eventually producing a blend. Who started, I wouldn't know.

Interviewer: Have you any notion what difference that made to the whisky?

The blending?

Interviewer: Yes.

Well, of course, there was a famous case in 19-, oh, I think about 1906, which led to a Royal Commission, which was known as the 'What is Whisky?' Commission, where there was a case taken in London, against a publican, who was accused of selling spirit, calling it Scotch whisky and it wasn't, merely because he had blended grain whisky with malt whisky. The result of all that was that grain whisky was recognised as another form of Scotch whisky, and that the blended grain whisky and malt whisky together could be called Scotch whisky as it is today under our existing law

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George Grant on Blended Whisky

1980s

distillers; distilleries; Grants of Glenfarclas; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the origins of blended whisky.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The other thing you mentioned was blending. Did that suddenly come up on the market, do you know, George, or did somebody hit upon this as a solitary finding?<br /> <br /> I - it's like all innovations or things that happen like this. Presumably several publicans had started doing it at the same time - buying whisky from different distillers - and then presumably buying grain whisky and mixing the two together and eventually producing a blend. Who started, I wouldn't know. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Have you any notion what difference that made to the whisky?<br /> <br /> The blending?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Well, of course, there was a famous case in 19-, oh, I think about 1906, which led to a Royal Commission, which was known as the 'What is Whisky?' Commission, where there was a case taken in London, against a publican, who was accused of selling spirit, calling it Scotch whisky and it wasn't, merely because he had blended grain whisky with malt whisky. The result of all that was that grain whisky was recognised as another form of Scotch whisky, and that the blended grain whisky and malt whisky together could be called Scotch whisky as it is today under our existing law