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TITLE
George Grant on Rough-Tasting Whisky
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_06
PLACENAME
Ballindalloch
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George S. Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1640
KEYWORDS
distillers
distilleries
Grants of Glenfarclas
whisky stills
audio

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George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the rough-tasting whisky in the days prior to The Immature Spirits Act in 1915, which decreed that whisky had to mature for at least two years. The following year this was raised to three years.

Interviewer: Before blending, I've heard people say that the spirit that was made was quite rough stuff. What's the difference, then between what we drink nowadays as a malt whisky - and unblended whisky - and in those times?

Well the main difference is age, of course, because up until Lloyd George's budget I think during the first war you could drink whisky as it came off the still. There was no law to say it had to be matured. And let's face, as you mature it, it's costing you money. You're losing by evaporation and of course you're paying interest on the money that's lying in stock. So the incentive in those days was to distill it today and drink it tomorrow. It must have been pretty rough. No question about it

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George Grant on Rough-Tasting Whisky

1980s

distillers; distilleries; Grants of Glenfarclas; whisky stills; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the rough-tasting whisky in the days prior to The Immature Spirits Act in 1915, which decreed that whisky had to mature for at least two years. The following year this was raised to three years. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Before blending, I've heard people say that the spirit that was made was quite rough stuff. What's the difference, then between what we drink nowadays as a malt whisky - and unblended whisky - and in those times?<br /> <br /> Well the main difference is age, of course, because up until Lloyd George's budget I think during the first war you could drink whisky as it came off the still. There was no law to say it had to be matured. And let's face, as you mature it, it's costing you money. You're losing by evaporation and of course you're paying interest on the money that's lying in stock. So the incentive in those days was to distill it today and drink it tomorrow. It must have been pretty rough. No question about it