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TITLE
George Grant - Early Years
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_07
PLACENAME
Ballindalloch
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George S. Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1641
KEYWORDS
distillers
distilleries
Grants of Glenfarclas
audio

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George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about his early years in the business.

Interviewer: Going back to your early days, though, in the business, were you born in Glenfarclas?

Yes, I was born in Glenfarclas.

Interviewer: Where were you educated, George?

I did most of my schooling at Aberdeen Grammar School.

Interviewer: Did you always want to go into the whisky business?

It's difficult to say looking back. It was sort of one of the things that was assumed you would do and I was running around the distillery from, I suppose, more or less the time I could run, so to speak. And I knew most of the employees and what they were doing and everything else before I was a teenager.

Interviewer: Did a lot of what they were doing rub off on you? I mean, did you understand the processes long before you would normally expect to?

Let's put it this way. In those days - I'm speaking about sort of the early mid thirties - quite a number of the employees probably didn't understand the process themselves, insofar as you got fellows who were turning malt, but - and they knew it had to germinate to a certain stage - but I'm not saying they knew exactly why they were doing it, apart from the fact that they knew it had to germinate.

Interviewer: And, did you fall in love with the process? I mean, that you said you sort of just fell into it. I'm sure it wasn't just quite like that.

It's difficult to say now looking back, it's quite a long time ago. I knew most of the people who were there. Don't forget that in the 1930s we weren't working anything to the extent we are today. In fact, I think it was 1929-30, or 30-31, there was one winter we never worked at all. The distillery was completely silent and it wasn't until the - America went wet sometime in the mid 30s, about 35-36 - that distilling took off again. Up until from the early 1900s until then the distilling industry was in a bit of a slump

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George Grant - Early Years

1980s

distillers; distilleries; Grants of Glenfarclas; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about his early years in the business.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Going back to your early days, though, in the business, were you born in Glenfarclas?<br /> <br /> Yes, I was born in Glenfarclas.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Where were you educated, George?<br /> <br /> I did most of my schooling at Aberdeen Grammar School.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you always want to go into the whisky business?<br /> <br /> It's difficult to say looking back. It was sort of one of the things that was assumed you would do and I was running around the distillery from, I suppose, more or less the time I could run, so to speak. And I knew most of the employees and what they were doing and everything else before I was a teenager.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did a lot of what they were doing rub off on you? I mean, did you understand the processes long before you would normally expect to? <br /> <br /> Let's put it this way. In those days - I'm speaking about sort of the early mid thirties - quite a number of the employees probably didn't understand the process themselves, insofar as you got fellows who were turning malt, but - and they knew it had to germinate to a certain stage - but I'm not saying they knew exactly why they were doing it, apart from the fact that they knew it had to germinate.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And, did you fall in love with the process? I mean, that you said you sort of just fell into it. I'm sure it wasn't just quite like that. <br /> <br /> It's difficult to say now looking back, it's quite a long time ago. I knew most of the people who were there. Don't forget that in the 1930s we weren't working anything to the extent we are today. In fact, I think it was 1929-30, or 30-31, there was one winter we never worked at all. The distillery was completely silent and it wasn't until the - America went wet sometime in the mid 30s, about 35-36 - that distilling took off again. Up until from the early 1900s until then the distilling industry was in a bit of a slump