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TITLE
George Grant on the Value of Peat in Distilling
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_13
PLACENAME
Ballindalloch
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George S. Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1649
KEYWORDS
distillers
distilleries
Grants of Glenfarclas
audio

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George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the value of peat in the distilling process.

Interviewer: What about the peat that's used in the making of whisky? Where does that come in?

The peat is used to dry the malt after the barley has germinated and you want to stop the growth. The peat is used at that stage. In the old days, on the open floors, we used to use coke, a mixture of coke and peat; the coke to provide the heat and the peat to provide the flavour. Nowadays it's done mainly by gas and hot air and so forth, the peat being burned separately to put the smoke through the drying malt. Malt'll take up any flavour you care to give it, you see. If - you find in the old days - the farmer stored his barley in the tractor shed you sometimes got barley coming in that had a stink of diesel oil which of course had to be rejected before we took it in, obviously. So it's one of these properties that we make use of, and it takes up the taste from the peat which is mainly phenol of course. And it's one of the methods of ascertaining the amount of peating in the malt is to test the phenol content

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George Grant on the Value of Peat in Distilling

1980s

distillers; distilleries; Grants of Glenfarclas; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about the value of peat in the distilling process.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What about the peat that's used in the making of whisky? Where does that come in?<br /> <br /> The peat is used to dry the malt after the barley has germinated and you want to stop the growth. The peat is used at that stage. In the old days, on the open floors, we used to use coke, a mixture of coke and peat; the coke to provide the heat and the peat to provide the flavour. Nowadays it's done mainly by gas and hot air and so forth, the peat being burned separately to put the smoke through the drying malt. Malt'll take up any flavour you care to give it, you see. If - you find in the old days - the farmer stored his barley in the tractor shed you sometimes got barley coming in that had a stink of diesel oil which of course had to be rejected before we took it in, obviously. So it's one of these properties that we make use of, and it takes up the taste from the peat which is mainly phenol of course. And it's one of the methods of ascertaining the amount of peating in the malt is to test the phenol content