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TITLE
George Grant on Foreign-Made Scotch (2 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_17
PLACENAME
Ballindalloch
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George S. Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1655
KEYWORDS
distillers
distilleries
Grants of Glenfarclas
audio

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George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about foreign-made whisky.

Interviewer: How alike is the foreign made imitation to Scotch whisky? Does is bear any resemblance at all?

Oh yes. Oh yes. But depending how much Scotch malt they put into it. If they load it up with Scotch malt, of course, there's a very striking resemblance to Scotch. You have to remember that a lot of Scotch goes out of Scotland, especially into the continental market, where there's a very low percentage of malt whisky in the blend and a large percentage of grain whisky. So, if you take an admixture, with a large percentage of malt, Scotch malt, in it, and a low percentage of a neutral spirit made in the country that admix it, it compares very favourable to some of these Scotches. But it's still not the genuine article, of course. One of the - I should say, one of the reasons for this you've got to lay at the door of the politicians because they create the climate to bring this about by taxation; by taxing an imported product at a higher rate than a locally distilled one. For instance, the Scotch shipped out of Scotland will be charged at say, rate of duty 'A' but if you ship malt whisky out in bulk and admix with a local spirit, the local spirit will be charged a lower rate of duty. So you're producing an admixture which can undersell the genuine Scotch just because of the government's distortion of duties

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George Grant on Foreign-Made Scotch (2 of 2)

1980s

distillers; distilleries; Grants of Glenfarclas; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

George S Grant (1923-2002) was chairman of Glenfarclas Distillery in Speyside for fifty-two years. His ancestor, John Grant, had purchased the distillery back in 1865 and it has remained in the Grant family ever since. George's son, John LS Grant, is the current chairman. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, George talks to Sam Marshall about foreign-made whisky.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How alike is the foreign made imitation to Scotch whisky? Does is bear any resemblance at all? <br /> <br /> Oh yes. Oh yes. But depending how much Scotch malt they put into it. If they load it up with Scotch malt, of course, there's a very striking resemblance to Scotch. You have to remember that a lot of Scotch goes out of Scotland, especially into the continental market, where there's a very low percentage of malt whisky in the blend and a large percentage of grain whisky. So, if you take an admixture, with a large percentage of malt, Scotch malt, in it, and a low percentage of a neutral spirit made in the country that admix it, it compares very favourable to some of these Scotches. But it's still not the genuine article, of course. One of the - I should say, one of the reasons for this you've got to lay at the door of the politicians because they create the climate to bring this about by taxation; by taxing an imported product at a higher rate than a locally distilled one. For instance, the Scotch shipped out of Scotland will be charged at say, rate of duty 'A' but if you ship malt whisky out in bulk and admix with a local spirit, the local spirit will be charged a lower rate of duty. So you're producing an admixture which can undersell the genuine Scotch just because of the government's distortion of duties