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TITLE
Origins of Hogmanay
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JANETMACINNES_01
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Janet MacInnes
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1706
KEYWORDS
New Year
New Years
pagan
tradition
traditions
customs
superstitions
audio

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In this audio extract, storyteller Janet MacInnes offers one explanation for the meaning of 'Hogmanay'. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.

There is no definite authoritative version of what the word is. Some suggest that it's of Scandinavian origin; some suggest that it's of French origin. The one I quite like, and bearing in mind that you never let the truth spoil a good story, was the suggestion that it came from the French 'au gui mener' which meant, in fact, to 'bring to the mistletoe'. Long ago, when in the pre-Christian era, the gods which were worshipped, were worshipped in the wood, and in the winter, at the heart of the winter, the darkest time of the winter, when people wanted the sun to come back, they wanted warmth and they would take a white bull, or two if they had them, and they would take them to the oak tree, to the mistletoe, and it wasn't the time the word came from, or the place, but the gift. Hogmanay was the bringing of the gift to the sun god to remind him to come back

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Origins of Hogmanay

1990s

New Year; New Years; pagan; tradition; traditions; customs; superstitions; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Hogmanay

In this audio extract, storyteller Janet MacInnes offers one explanation for the meaning of 'Hogmanay'. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.<br /> <br /> There is no definite authoritative version of what the word is. Some suggest that it's of Scandinavian origin; some suggest that it's of French origin. The one I quite like, and bearing in mind that you never let the truth spoil a good story, was the suggestion that it came from the French 'au gui mener' which meant, in fact, to 'bring to the mistletoe'. Long ago, when in the pre-Christian era, the gods which were worshipped, were worshipped in the wood, and in the winter, at the heart of the winter, the darkest time of the winter, when people wanted the sun to come back, they wanted warmth and they would take a white bull, or two if they had them, and they would take them to the oak tree, to the mistletoe, and it wasn't the time the word came from, or the place, but the gift. Hogmanay was the bringing of the gift to the sun god to remind him to come back