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TITLE
Duke of Kent's plane crash, Caithness (3 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMHENDERSON_03
PLACENAME
Dunbeath
DISTRICT
Southern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Latheron
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Henderson
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1714
KEYWORDS
Second World War
conspiracies
conspiracy
crashes
accidents
audio

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Prince George, Duke of Kent, (1902-1942) was killed in a plane crash during World War II at Eagle's Rock, near Dunbeath, Caithness. The Sunderland Flying Boat in which he was flying was officially heading to Iceland where the Duke was to meet senior members of the U.S. military. In this audio extract, Jim Henderson, former editor of the 'Northern Times', discusses some of the issues surrounding the event. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.

Interviewer: The young rear gunner must have had a terrible time though, because he was in a very bad shape when he was found?

Yes, the feeling was that Andrew Jack, in fact, who was only twenty-one at the time, had been thrown out with the impact with most of the tailplane. It was the only part of the aircraft that was virtually intact. After all, it was carrying two and half thousand gallons of aviation fuel, so the tremendous explosion and the burn up must have been colossal. But Jack himself, knowing of course that he had a royal personage on board, must have gone back into the aircraft to try and save the Duke of Kent because he suffered the most dreadful burns. Now, having been thrown clear, one would suppose that his injuries would not have involved burning at all. He wasn't found until the following day when he wandered into a shepherd's cottage away at the back of Dunbeath.

Interview: And I suppose after all this time we never will know the real truth of the accident?

Well, Andrew Jack ended up as an air traffic controller at Prestwick Airport. I remember an occasion when I tried to interview him, to ask him about this, and he just wouldn't discuss it at all. The only chance is that on the fiftieth anniversary, the government may well decide to open the book and let us know exactly who was flying the aircraft at that time, what its flight path should have been, and why it was so far off course

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Duke of Kent's plane crash, Caithness (3 of 3)

CAITHNESS: Latheron

1990s

Second World War; conspiracies; conspiracy; crashes; accidents; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Duke of Kent Plane Crash

Prince George, Duke of Kent, (1902-1942) was killed in a plane crash during World War II at Eagle's Rock, near Dunbeath, Caithness. The Sunderland Flying Boat in which he was flying was officially heading to Iceland where the Duke was to meet senior members of the U.S. military. In this audio extract, Jim Henderson, former editor of the 'Northern Times', discusses some of the issues surrounding the event. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The young rear gunner must have had a terrible time though, because he was in a very bad shape when he was found?<br /> <br /> Yes, the feeling was that Andrew Jack, in fact, who was only twenty-one at the time, had been thrown out with the impact with most of the tailplane. It was the only part of the aircraft that was virtually intact. After all, it was carrying two and half thousand gallons of aviation fuel, so the tremendous explosion and the burn up must have been colossal. But Jack himself, knowing of course that he had a royal personage on board, must have gone back into the aircraft to try and save the Duke of Kent because he suffered the most dreadful burns. Now, having been thrown clear, one would suppose that his injuries would not have involved burning at all. He wasn't found until the following day when he wandered into a shepherd's cottage away at the back of Dunbeath.<br /> <br /> Interview: And I suppose after all this time we never will know the real truth of the accident?<br /> <br /> Well, Andrew Jack ended up as an air traffic controller at Prestwick Airport. I remember an occasion when I tried to interview him, to ask him about this, and he just wouldn't discuss it at all. The only chance is that on the fiftieth anniversary, the government may well decide to open the book and let us know exactly who was flying the aircraft at that time, what its flight path should have been, and why it was so far off course