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TITLE
Jim Love - Growing up in Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_01
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1715
KEYWORDS
audios
childhood
reminiscences

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about growing up in Inverness.

Interviewer: Now, you're an Invernessian born and bred?

Yes, aye, that's right. Not too sure where - Rosedene I think it was but I can't remember about it too well at the time. But my family were living in Muirtown Street, just round the corner from Kenneth Street there. I don't think the - the houses were knocked down to make way for the, the roundabout at the end of the Friars Bridge so I spent my early days there and went to the Central School from Muirtown Street. I remember being carried along on a chair on the back of my mother's bike to go to school for the first day.

Miss Chisholm, who stayed round the corner in Attadale Road or Percival Road, was the first primary schoolteacher that I had. Then I moved up to Miss Cameron's class and she was in charge of the school band. And my father had been a drummer in the army band so I was very keen to get into the, the school band. So I was asked - it was just a percussion band - I was asked to play the tambourine. The day we came to give the concert, I remember, in the infants' school, in Planefield Road, the teacher was standing up at the back of the hall and she was miming along with the band and I was watching her instead of watching the conductor so every time she stuck up her hand with the tambourine, I stuck up my hand and of course I was about five seconds behind everybody else, so it was a great disappointment to my father, I must hasten to add. I didn't inherit his sort of sense of rhythm.

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Jim Love - Growing up in Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1990s

audios; childhood; reminiscences

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about growing up in Inverness.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, you're an Invernessian born and bred?<br /> <br /> Yes, aye, that's right. Not too sure where - Rosedene I think it was but I can't remember about it too well at the time. But my family were living in Muirtown Street, just round the corner from Kenneth Street there. I don't think the - the houses were knocked down to make way for the, the roundabout at the end of the Friars Bridge so I spent my early days there and went to the Central School from Muirtown Street. I remember being carried along on a chair on the back of my mother's bike to go to school for the first day. <br /> <br /> Miss Chisholm, who stayed round the corner in Attadale Road or Percival Road, was the first primary schoolteacher that I had. Then I moved up to Miss Cameron's class and she was in charge of the school band. And my father had been a drummer in the army band so I was very keen to get into the, the school band. So I was asked - it was just a percussion band - I was asked to play the tambourine. The day we came to give the concert, I remember, in the infants' school, in Planefield Road, the teacher was standing up at the back of the hall and she was miming along with the band and I was watching her instead of watching the conductor so every time she stuck up her hand with the tambourine, I stuck up my hand and of course I was about five seconds behind everybody else, so it was a great disappointment to my father, I must hasten to add. I didn't inherit his sort of sense of rhythm.