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TITLE
Jim Love - Schooldays (1)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1717
KEYWORDS
audios

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his schooldays.

Interviewer: So were your young schooldays then a good time in your life?

Oh, yes. A lot of fun at school. A lot of fun at school. The school seemed to be very much - the teachers were very musical and very into putting on concerts and things. We did a pantomime, when I was 'Little Boy Blue' in the pantomime. Don't have the knees for tights but it was a lot of fun. J. MacDonald, Miss J. Macdonald, who was my teacher in primary four, she used to give us music lessons outside the lessons that we used to get in the afternoon from Mr. Mallison who used to travel around the schools giving singing lessons to everybody and teaching them so-fah. And she used to supplement these lessons by playing the class radio and listening to music there. That was the - where I first heard Mozart and Dvorák and Sibelius and things like this. I used to think it was great.

She was a very good teacher of the three r's as well - four r's perhaps - reading, writing, arithmetic, and rhythm. She was, she was a smashing teacher. She left after one year and emigrated to Rhodesia and sadly died there not long afterwards. After Miss MacDonald we'd several other teachers and primary seven was Miss Harriet MacLennan. All the kids, I remember, had a great fear of Harriet - her reputation preceded her but when we actually got there she was a very good teacher and if you show'd interest in what she was doing she was, she wasn't as bad as she was supposed to be. And she encouraged my interest in, in drawing; she took a great interest in that and in natural history. I remember we used to have to do these nature note things over the weekend and then we'd to draw something that we had seen of natural history interest and then write a - about two hundred words - about it. And like everybody else, just about I should imagine, I got my mother and father to do it for me. Always got 'vg' for the drawing but Harriet knew fine that it was, it was my father that was doing it. 'That was a particularly good one from your dad, this week', she would say.

On one occasion she commented on that, I remember. It was a frog which had a rather nice glint in its eye, and I was very proud of this because I had actually done this one myself and Harriet was impressed with it as well and she said, 'That was a really good one from your dad this week' and I said 'Oh, I did that, Miss' and she wouldn't believe me. It was impossible to convince her that I was responsible for, for that particular masterpiece that week.

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Jim Love - Schooldays (1)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his schooldays.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So were your young schooldays then a good time in your life?<br /> <br /> Oh, yes. A lot of fun at school. A lot of fun at school. The school seemed to be very much - the teachers were very musical and very into putting on concerts and things. We did a pantomime, when I was 'Little Boy Blue' in the pantomime. Don't have the knees for tights but it was a lot of fun. J. MacDonald, Miss J. Macdonald, who was my teacher in primary four, she used to give us music lessons outside the lessons that we used to get in the afternoon from Mr. Mallison who used to travel around the schools giving singing lessons to everybody and teaching them so-fah. And she used to supplement these lessons by playing the class radio and listening to music there. That was the - where I first heard Mozart and Dvorák and Sibelius and things like this. I used to think it was great. <br /> <br /> She was a very good teacher of the three r's as well - four r's perhaps - reading, writing, arithmetic, and rhythm. She was, she was a smashing teacher. She left after one year and emigrated to Rhodesia and sadly died there not long afterwards. After Miss MacDonald we'd several other teachers and primary seven was Miss Harriet MacLennan. All the kids, I remember, had a great fear of Harriet - her reputation preceded her but when we actually got there she was a very good teacher and if you show'd interest in what she was doing she was, she wasn't as bad as she was supposed to be. And she encouraged my interest in, in drawing; she took a great interest in that and in natural history. I remember we used to have to do these nature note things over the weekend and then we'd to draw something that we had seen of natural history interest and then write a - about two hundred words - about it. And like everybody else, just about I should imagine, I got my mother and father to do it for me. Always got 'vg' for the drawing but Harriet knew fine that it was, it was my father that was doing it. 'That was a particularly good one from your dad, this week', she would say. <br /> <br /> On one occasion she commented on that, I remember. It was a frog which had a rather nice glint in its eye, and I was very proud of this because I had actually done this one myself and Harriet was impressed with it as well and she said, 'That was a really good one from your dad this week' and I said 'Oh, I did that, Miss' and she wouldn't believe me. It was impossible to convince her that I was responsible for, for that particular masterpiece that week.