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TITLE
Jim Love - Schooldays (4)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_05
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1721
KEYWORDS
audios

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his schooldays.

Interviewer: What about your school work? Were you clever in school?

Well, any illusions that I might have had about my cleverness were quickly dispelled at the academy because, up there, because everybody had to pass the qualifying exam, they were the cleverest kids in town. Now, people go to school depending on where they live but before they used to take the top ones out of each school in the entire town and they all landed up in the Academy. There was kids from down the Merkinch; there was kids from Dalneigh (by this time I was, I was living in Laurel Avenue); there were kids from the Crown; there were even girls from Heatherly which was the public school at the time - big house up in Culduthel Road now which is divided into flats - but there were doctors' daughters and things from Heatherly.

Interviewer: So you had to come from the Laurel Avenue district of Inverness and come across - you were obviously called a 'Caddy Rat' on many occasions?

Yes, that's right. Yes, aye. That didn't particularly bother me, I don't think. I suppose there was a bit of rivalry between the Academy and the High School, but not being involved in the sporting scene at all, I never really sort of thought anything. I had too many pals who were at the High School to sort of bother about any sort of rivalry like that.

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Jim Love - Schooldays (4)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his schooldays.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What about your school work? Were you clever in school?<br /> <br /> Well, any illusions that I might have had about my cleverness were quickly dispelled at the academy because, up there, because everybody had to pass the qualifying exam, they were the cleverest kids in town. Now, people go to school depending on where they live but before they used to take the top ones out of each school in the entire town and they all landed up in the Academy. There was kids from down the Merkinch; there was kids from Dalneigh (by this time I was, I was living in Laurel Avenue); there were kids from the Crown; there were even girls from Heatherly which was the public school at the time - big house up in Culduthel Road now which is divided into flats - but there were doctors' daughters and things from Heatherly.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So you had to come from the Laurel Avenue district of Inverness and come across - you were obviously called a 'Caddy Rat' on many occasions?<br /> <br /> Yes, that's right. Yes, aye. That didn't particularly bother me, I don't think. I suppose there was a bit of rivalry between the Academy and the High School, but not being involved in the sporting scene at all, I never really sort of thought anything. I had too many pals who were at the High School to sort of bother about any sort of rivalry like that.