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TITLE
Jim Love - Early Career
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_06
PLACENAME
London
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1723
KEYWORDS
audios

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his early career.

Interviewer: Did you think in the early days what sort of career you were going to follow?

Well, I used to think about surveying but I was very bad with figures. I only passed two mathematics exams in my life - the very first one I sat and the very last one, six years later - so I decided no surveying is not going to be good for me cos you're going to have to do calculations and everything. And I had thought about journalism because my cousin - Alex Maine - is a journalist and he was working at that time for the 'Press & Journal' and he used to come along with his wife, Ella, on Sunday evenings to visit my parents, and he used to teach me shorthand. But somehow, I don't know why, the idea dropped out of my mind, and I came to leave school and all I knew was that I didn't want to go to university because I'd had six years of studying and I thought I don't really have the application for it.

I'd thought about art school but everybody said oh, there's no future in art, you know, not a good career in art, so I just sort of drifted into the Civil Service and got sent down to London to work as a clerk in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, in Whitehall. And I turned up on the first day for work and there was two of us - another young lad and myself, eighteen, fresh from school - and they had two jobs going. One was in the art department and one was in the legal department. So I thought, oh, I'll be all right for the art department, you know, higher art and a prize for art, this'll be for me and I might like this after all. And typical civil service of course, there's never any accounting or predicting what they're going to do. They put me into the legal department, typical square peg in a round hole.

So I ended up in the legal department. So, I mean, I'm an absolute expert on guarding thrashing machines, tractors, and other agricultural implements because that's what we used to do; we used to prosecute farmers who failed to take adequate safeguards for their employees. So there's very little I don't know about these regulations.

But after that I got promoted and again the old Civil Service thinking came into play and they said, 'What would you like to do?' and I said 'Well, I don't mind as long as it's not a job with figures.' So they put me into the Inland Revenue! So after two years they called me in and said, 'You're not terribly good at this are you?' and I said, 'Well, I told you two years ago that I wasn't very good with figures and that I didn't want a job with figures.' So they said, 'We're going to make you a surveyor' and I said, 'Well, I decided when I was sixteen that I didn't want to be a surveyor, so I think I'll go and try something else.'

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Jim Love - Early Career

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his early career.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you think in the early days what sort of career you were going to follow?<br /> <br /> Well, I used to think about surveying but I was very bad with figures. I only passed two mathematics exams in my life - the very first one I sat and the very last one, six years later - so I decided no surveying is not going to be good for me cos you're going to have to do calculations and everything. And I had thought about journalism because my cousin - Alex Maine - is a journalist and he was working at that time for the 'Press & Journal' and he used to come along with his wife, Ella, on Sunday evenings to visit my parents, and he used to teach me shorthand. But somehow, I don't know why, the idea dropped out of my mind, and I came to leave school and all I knew was that I didn't want to go to university because I'd had six years of studying and I thought I don't really have the application for it. <br /> <br /> I'd thought about art school but everybody said oh, there's no future in art, you know, not a good career in art, so I just sort of drifted into the Civil Service and got sent down to London to work as a clerk in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, in Whitehall. And I turned up on the first day for work and there was two of us - another young lad and myself, eighteen, fresh from school - and they had two jobs going. One was in the art department and one was in the legal department. So I thought, oh, I'll be all right for the art department, you know, higher art and a prize for art, this'll be for me and I might like this after all. And typical civil service of course, there's never any accounting or predicting what they're going to do. They put me into the legal department, typical square peg in a round hole. <br /> <br /> So I ended up in the legal department. So, I mean, I'm an absolute expert on guarding thrashing machines, tractors, and other agricultural implements because that's what we used to do; we used to prosecute farmers who failed to take adequate safeguards for their employees. So there's very little I don't know about these regulations. <br /> <br /> But after that I got promoted and again the old Civil Service thinking came into play and they said, 'What would you like to do?' and I said 'Well, I don't mind as long as it's not a job with figures.' So they put me into the Inland Revenue! So after two years they called me in and said, 'You're not terribly good at this are you?' and I said, 'Well, I told you two years ago that I wasn't very good with figures and that I didn't want a job with figures.' So they said, 'We're going to make you a surveyor' and I said, 'Well, I decided when I was sixteen that I didn't want to be a surveyor, so I think I'll go and try something else.'