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TITLE
Jim Love - London Experience
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_07
PLACENAME
London
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1724
KEYWORDS
audios

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his London experience.

Interviewer: Tell me a bit about when you were in London. Was that a big change moving from Inverness down to London?

Yes, I'd never really been in the big city before. Ah, we stayed in a hostel and there was a lot of Scots guys in the hostel so we kind of hung around together. But the office was in Whitehall, as I said, and at the end of, the opposite end of the road, was the BBC Playhouse studios and they used to record all their entertainment programmes down there. So at lunchtime we would take some sandwiches and pop down and we used to watch them record, eh, 'Go Man Go' with the [Oscar] Rabin Band with Colin Day, Ray Pilgrim and Barbara Kay, and, eh, Bob Miller's Show Band. On a Wednesday evening, 'Easy Beat' with Brian Matthew.

And in those days, of course, it was the trad boom and they always had a jazz band. And after the show we used to go the pub and used to have a drink with Kenny Ball and Alex Welsh, and Acker Bilk and people like this, so you used to get to know them quite well. I remember once, Brian Matthew always started the programme halfway through, they used to do a sort of Jukebox Jury type thing, and they would play three records to various people and ask for their comments on it, and whenever he used to play a Cliff Richard record he used to get this sort of disgruntled murmuring from the audience and he used to have to appeal to the audience, 'We are now going to play a Cliff Richard record so would you please keep quiet!' And then he would go back to the top of the show and start doing the live bits.

Em, so, I got very involved in jazz then, I used to go to jazz shows, em, which was the jazz club at 100 Oxford Street, which was a very famous jazz club, and all the top traditional bands used to play there. We even once went to Ronnie Scott's which seemed, you know, very swank for an eighteen year old, gallous teenager from the Highlands to go into such a, a very fantoush place as that, where they had a maitre d' and, ah, very expensive menu and drinks and, and things.

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Jim Love - London Experience

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his London experience.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Tell me a bit about when you were in London. Was that a big change moving from Inverness down to London? <br /> <br /> Yes, I'd never really been in the big city before. Ah, we stayed in a hostel and there was a lot of Scots guys in the hostel so we kind of hung around together. But the office was in Whitehall, as I said, and at the end of, the opposite end of the road, was the BBC Playhouse studios and they used to record all their entertainment programmes down there. So at lunchtime we would take some sandwiches and pop down and we used to watch them record, eh, 'Go Man Go' with the [Oscar] Rabin Band with Colin Day, Ray Pilgrim and Barbara Kay, and, eh, Bob Miller's Show Band. On a Wednesday evening, 'Easy Beat' with Brian Matthew. <br /> <br /> And in those days, of course, it was the trad boom and they always had a jazz band. And after the show we used to go the pub and used to have a drink with Kenny Ball and Alex Welsh, and Acker Bilk and people like this, so you used to get to know them quite well. I remember once, Brian Matthew always started the programme halfway through, they used to do a sort of Jukebox Jury type thing, and they would play three records to various people and ask for their comments on it, and whenever he used to play a Cliff Richard record he used to get this sort of disgruntled murmuring from the audience and he used to have to appeal to the audience, 'We are now going to play a Cliff Richard record so would you please keep quiet!' And then he would go back to the top of the show and start doing the live bits. <br /> <br /> Em, so, I got very involved in jazz then, I used to go to jazz shows, em, which was the jazz club at 100 Oxford Street, which was a very famous jazz club, and all the top traditional bands used to play there. We even once went to Ronnie Scott's which seemed, you know, very swank for an eighteen year old, gallous teenager from the Highlands to go into such a, a very fantoush place as that, where they had a maitre d' and, ah, very expensive menu and drinks and, and things.