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TITLE
Jim Love - Interest in Jazz
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_08
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1726
KEYWORDS
audios

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his interest in jazz.

Interviewer: Now, but your interest in jazz actually started in Inverness?

Yes, that's right. Em, in the fifties, there was a jazz club in the Exchange which is roughly where the, the steps up to Upper Bridge Street are now. And, eh, some local enthusiasts had taken over some vacant rooms above the shops in the Exchange, and had done them up into this very dimly lit atmospheric place where they used to listen to jazz records, dance to jazz records and, very occasionally, eh, get some musicians in to play jazz. And it was, I suppose, quite a, an exotic place and eh, I managed to infiltrate there as a fifteen year old.

There I was introduced to people playing different styles of jazz, like Mr Young [Lee] and Stan Getz and Miles Davis and Cannonball Adderly and musicians for whom I've still got a great, a great affection. After the Exchange was demolished to make way for Bridge Street, the guys in the jazz club went looking for alternative premises and then obtained a basement in the Ness Café, which again was con-, it was really I think, from the point of view of facilities and atmosphere, was the best of all the premises they ever had.

But eventually they lost that and they went looking for somewhere else and they found an upstairs room in Eastgate, eh, above Gordon's Grain Store, or Fraser MacColl's, I suppose you should say, and they converted that in. But by that time the jazz boom had passed, it was the mid sixties, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and everything had started, so jazz club fell away then, and went into abeyance for ten years; it was ten years before it was resurrected, but that's another story.

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Jim Love - Interest in Jazz

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his interest in jazz.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, but your interest in jazz actually started in Inverness? <br /> <br /> Yes, that's right. Em, in the fifties, there was a jazz club in the Exchange which is roughly where the, the steps up to Upper Bridge Street are now. And, eh, some local enthusiasts had taken over some vacant rooms above the shops in the Exchange, and had done them up into this very dimly lit atmospheric place where they used to listen to jazz records, dance to jazz records and, very occasionally, eh, get some musicians in to play jazz. And it was, I suppose, quite a, an exotic place and eh, I managed to infiltrate there as a fifteen year old. <br /> <br /> There I was introduced to people playing different styles of jazz, like Mr Young [Lee] and Stan Getz and Miles Davis and Cannonball Adderly and musicians for whom I've still got a great, a great affection. After the Exchange was demolished to make way for Bridge Street, the guys in the jazz club went looking for alternative premises and then obtained a basement in the Ness Café, which again was con-, it was really I think, from the point of view of facilities and atmosphere, was the best of all the premises they ever had. <br /> <br /> But eventually they lost that and they went looking for somewhere else and they found an upstairs room in Eastgate, eh, above Gordon's Grain Store, or Fraser MacColl's, I suppose you should say, and they converted that in. But by that time the jazz boom had passed, it was the mid sixties, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and everything had started, so jazz club fell away then, and went into abeyance for ten years; it was ten years before it was resurrected, but that's another story.