Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Jim Love - 'Inverness Courier'
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_14
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1735
KEYWORDS
audios

Get Adobe Flash player

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his time as editor of the 'Inverness Courier'.

Interviewer: Jim you were a long, long time with the 'Press and Journal' and just lately you've moved on to greener pastures?

Yes, I'm now with the 'Inverness Courier.' Stuart Lindsay, an old friend and colleague of mine, he used to be my boss at the 'Press and Journal', we worked together very well for several years, recently acquired the 'Inverness Courier' from Miss Barron and started expanding the paper and he asked me to join them just over a year ago. He was keen to expand the coverage of arts and entertainment that the 'Courier' had always provided, through its coverage of Eden Court and the Edinburgh Festival and other events. And because I'd done, dabbled slightly in that in the course of my news duties at the 'Press and Journal', he thought that I might be able to provide a similar service on a more full time basis for him. So I've been there for the past thirteen months covering all sorts of things.

Interviewer: That must have been a big change in your life, Jim, after so many years with the 'Press and Journal', to move to something - I suppose the 'Courier' was quite new having been taken over?

Yes that's true; it's very exciting. I mean, the 'Courier' has a long tradition and very, very high standards. It's quite a challenge to try and maintain those traditions and standards, and at the same time to build on a service that's being provided for readers. I must admit it's still a bit funny, because every time a fire engine or police car goes past with the siren going, my natural instinct is to follow it and I've got to say, 'No, that's not your patch anymore.'

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Jim Love - 'Inverness Courier'

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson about his time as editor of the 'Inverness Courier'.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Jim you were a long, long time with the 'Press and Journal' and just lately you've moved on to greener pastures?<br /> <br /> Yes, I'm now with the 'Inverness Courier.' Stuart Lindsay, an old friend and colleague of mine, he used to be my boss at the 'Press and Journal', we worked together very well for several years, recently acquired the 'Inverness Courier' from Miss Barron and started expanding the paper and he asked me to join them just over a year ago. He was keen to expand the coverage of arts and entertainment that the 'Courier' had always provided, through its coverage of Eden Court and the Edinburgh Festival and other events. And because I'd done, dabbled slightly in that in the course of my news duties at the 'Press and Journal', he thought that I might be able to provide a similar service on a more full time basis for him. So I've been there for the past thirteen months covering all sorts of things. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: That must have been a big change in your life, Jim, after so many years with the 'Press and Journal', to move to something - I suppose the 'Courier' was quite new having been taken over? <br /> <br /> Yes that's true; it's very exciting. I mean, the 'Courier' has a long tradition and very, very high standards. It's quite a challenge to try and maintain those traditions and standards, and at the same time to build on a service that's being provided for readers. I must admit it's still a bit funny, because every time a fire engine or police car goes past with the siren going, my natural instinct is to follow it and I've got to say, 'No, that's not your patch anymore.'