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TITLE
Jim Love - Flight on a Shackleton
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_15
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Jim Love
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1736
KEYWORDS
audios

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Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.

In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson talks about a flight he took on a Shackleton aircraft.

Interviewer: You must have a few stories to tell?

Yes, one that stands out from my early days was - the RAF used to make a Christmas drop to the light ships, the north Atlantic weather ships, and they used to fly out from Kinloss and they used to drop Christmas trees, Christmas parcels, Christmas pudding to these guys who were somewhere two hundred miles due south of Iceland. And they always took the press with them to cover this and they would get some nice pictures of these Christmas goodies dropping out of a Shackleton onto a weather ship. And there were always two Shackletons did it; one to do the drop and one holding the press men to take the pictures and write the story. And I'm not a very good traveller and the night before we flew was the night of the officers' party at the mess at Kinloss and we were naturally invited to that.

So I thought, 'Well, flying the next day, I really don't want to drink too much, so a half pint of beer, but they were serving goulash. Now, on reflection, goulash was the wrong thing to eat, but when we got up into the plane the next morning I was extremely ill. And we did what any ordinary human being would do faced in that predicament, was to go to the toilet. But this isn't like British Airways and other people need to go to the toilet, and there's only one, and I had commandeered this toilet for the best part of the outward flight. So eventually they managed to prise me out of the toilet, propped me beside a porthole on the fuselage of the aircraft, I don't know if they call them portholes, and they opened the window so I could get some fresh air, flying at something like five thousand feet, and it's a miracle I didn't freeze to death. But there are still some pictures in existence of me in a flying helmet and a flying jacket with an enormous paper bag between my knees, dead to the world.

When we got back we discovered that there was some problems with one of the engines so, we were, thanks to the skill of the pilot, we got down no bother but our hearts were in our mouths for part of the time.

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Jim Love - Flight on a Shackleton

1990s

audios

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Jim Love

Jim Love (1943 - 2006) was one of the Highlands' most respected journalists. He joined the 'Inverness Courier' in 1988, becoming editor in 2003. He had previously been an Inverness-based reporter with the 'Press and Journal'. One of Jim's passions was jazz music but he also played a major part in the blossoming of the traditional music scene in the Highlands in the 1990s and 2000s.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the radio programme 'Moray Firth People' Jim talks to Helen MacPherson talks about a flight he took on a Shackleton aircraft.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You must have a few stories to tell?<br /> <br /> Yes, one that stands out from my early days was - the RAF used to make a Christmas drop to the light ships, the north Atlantic weather ships, and they used to fly out from Kinloss and they used to drop Christmas trees, Christmas parcels, Christmas pudding to these guys who were somewhere two hundred miles due south of Iceland. And they always took the press with them to cover this and they would get some nice pictures of these Christmas goodies dropping out of a Shackleton onto a weather ship. And there were always two Shackletons did it; one to do the drop and one holding the press men to take the pictures and write the story. And I'm not a very good traveller and the night before we flew was the night of the officers' party at the mess at Kinloss and we were naturally invited to that. <br /> <br /> So I thought, 'Well, flying the next day, I really don't want to drink too much, so a half pint of beer, but they were serving goulash. Now, on reflection, goulash was the wrong thing to eat, but when we got up into the plane the next morning I was extremely ill. And we did what any ordinary human being would do faced in that predicament, was to go to the toilet. But this isn't like British Airways and other people need to go to the toilet, and there's only one, and I had commandeered this toilet for the best part of the outward flight. So eventually they managed to prise me out of the toilet, propped me beside a porthole on the fuselage of the aircraft, I don't know if they call them portholes, and they opened the window so I could get some fresh air, flying at something like five thousand feet, and it's a miracle I didn't freeze to death. But there are still some pictures in existence of me in a flying helmet and a flying jacket with an enormous paper bag between my knees, dead to the world. <br /> <br /> When we got back we discovered that there was some problems with one of the engines so, we were, thanks to the skill of the pilot, we got down no bother but our hearts were in our mouths for part of the time.