Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
John Urquhart (The Bogan) - Early Life
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JOHNNYBOGAN_01
PLACENAME
Muir of Ord
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Urray
DATE OF RECORDING
2000
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Johnny Bogan (a.k.a. John Urquhart)
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1741
KEYWORDS
comics
comedians
variety
show business
Highland Railway
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

The comedian John Urquhart, from Muir of Ord, entertained audiences throughout the Highlands and Islands for over fifty years, since his debut in 1952. He was better known as 'Johnny Bogan' or simply, 'The Bogan'. He died in November 2006. In this Moray Firth Radio audio extract from 2000 Johnny talks about his early life.

Ah wis born in Muir of Ord. Ma father wis born in Fearn actually, and the whole family moved to Muir of Ord an they took on the blacksmith's business in the Muir. Ma mother, she stayed outside the village in a wee croft which wis known as the 'Corrie', outside Muir of Ord. And that wis it. An he worked on the railway for, well, all his - most of his life, most of his life he worked on the railway. Before that he worked on the woods.

Interviewer: And who ran the blacksmith's shop then?

Ma uncle.

Interviewer: And whit did yer dad do on the railway?

He wis a surfaceman on the railway, aye.

Interviewer: Walkin the track?

Walkin the track, checkin the line, all the time.

Interviewer: Did yer dad travel a lot in connection with the job then?

Well, he wis - he did at times but we always stayed in the village. But they did travel quite a lot in that day. There were, they were in the 'P-way', an the 'P-way' wis a squad o men that went from, say, Inverness up as far as Wick an Thurso, an down to Aviemore as well, an the bad times wis the winter. They would go away for three or four days in the winter time, clearing the snow from the tracks, an he disappeared for quite a few, quite a few days. An of course we had the Black Isle line at that time as well, an he'd cover that sometimes and - An Ah always remember during the war he had to go out every Sunday night at twelve o'clock to check the points on the railway, just outside the village, because the big train from Scapa Flow wi the troops came down every [Sunday] night at twelve o'clock an he had to make sure that those points operated right, because it just thundered through the village, shook every window from one end of the street to the other, an it went bang on time - twelve o'clock. Couple o hikers, as they [were] called 'hikers'; that's that big engine, Ah canna mind the numbers or anything like that, but we as kids went up onto the window o the house at twelve o'clock on a Sunday night to see this thing firing through. Ye wouldn't see much because it wis all in the blackout.

Interviewer: Now ye mentioned the Black Isle line; I didn't know about that. Tell me about that, John.

Well, the Black Isle line, many's the time Ah got a wee trip down in the tender o the engine by one of the drivers - take ye down so far an take ye back and shunt around. And we also had the big turning table there as well which wis great fun as a youngster, because they turned the engines there an it wis great fun.

Interviewer: And where did the track go to?

Right down to Fortrose. So there wis all those wee stations all the way down there.

Interviewer: An that disappeared in the Beeching time, did it?

Oh aye, aye, it wis all finished then, ye know?

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

John Urquhart (The Bogan) - Early Life

ROSS: Urray

2000s

comics; comedians; variety; show business; Highland Railway; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Johnny Bogan

The comedian John Urquhart, from Muir of Ord, entertained audiences throughout the Highlands and Islands for over fifty years, since his debut in 1952. He was better known as 'Johnny Bogan' or simply, 'The Bogan'. He died in November 2006. In this Moray Firth Radio audio extract from 2000 Johnny talks about his early life.<br /> <br /> Ah wis born in Muir of Ord. Ma father wis born in Fearn actually, and the whole family moved to Muir of Ord an they took on the blacksmith's business in the Muir. Ma mother, she stayed outside the village in a wee croft which wis known as the 'Corrie', outside Muir of Ord. And that wis it. An he worked on the railway for, well, all his - most of his life, most of his life he worked on the railway. Before that he worked on the woods. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And who ran the blacksmith's shop then?<br /> <br /> Ma uncle.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And whit did yer dad do on the railway?<br /> <br /> He wis a surfaceman on the railway, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Walkin the track?<br /> <br /> Walkin the track, checkin the line, all the time.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did yer dad travel a lot in connection with the job then?<br /> <br /> Well, he wis - he did at times but we always stayed in the village. But they did travel quite a lot in that day. There were, they were in the 'P-way', an the 'P-way' wis a squad o men that went from, say, Inverness up as far as Wick an Thurso, an down to Aviemore as well, an the bad times wis the winter. They would go away for three or four days in the winter time, clearing the snow from the tracks, an he disappeared for quite a few, quite a few days. An of course we had the Black Isle line at that time as well, an he'd cover that sometimes and - An Ah always remember during the war he had to go out every Sunday night at twelve o'clock to check the points on the railway, just outside the village, because the big train from Scapa Flow wi the troops came down every [Sunday] night at twelve o'clock an he had to make sure that those points operated right, because it just thundered through the village, shook every window from one end of the street to the other, an it went bang on time - twelve o'clock. Couple o hikers, as they [were] called 'hikers'; that's that big engine, Ah canna mind the numbers or anything like that, but we as kids went up onto the window o the house at twelve o'clock on a Sunday night to see this thing firing through. Ye wouldn't see much because it wis all in the blackout.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now ye mentioned the Black Isle line; I didn't know about that. Tell me about that, John.<br /> <br /> Well, the Black Isle line, many's the time Ah got a wee trip down in the tender o the engine by one of the drivers - take ye down so far an take ye back and shunt around. And we also had the big turning table there as well which wis great fun as a youngster, because they turned the engines there an it wis great fun.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And where did the track go to?<br /> <br /> Right down to Fortrose. So there wis all those wee stations all the way down there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An that disappeared in the Beeching time, did it?<br /> <br /> Oh aye, aye, it wis all finished then, ye know?