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TITLE
John Urquhart (The Bogan) - Life as a blacksmith
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JOHNNYBOGAN_03
PLACENAME
Muir of Ord
DISTRICT
Muir of Ord
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Urray
DATE OF RECORDING
2000
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Johnny Bogan (a.k.a. John Urquhart)
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1744
KEYWORDS
comics
comedians
variety
show business
smithie
audio

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The comedian John Urquhart, from Muir of Ord, entertained audiences throughout the Highlands and Islands for over fifty years, since his debut in 1952. He was better known as 'Johnny Bogan' or simply, 'The Bogan'. He died in November 2006. In this Moray Firth Radio audio extract from 2000 Johnny talks about his life as a blacksmith.

Interviewer: What did ye do when ye left school then, Johnny, first?

What did Ah do when Ah left school, Ah went to work with ma uncle in the blacksmith's shop.

Interviewer: The blacksmith's shop, there. Were ye shoeing horses? Did ye get round to that?

Ah did try it, but Ah didn't like it. But Ah liked in the smiddy. Ah didn't mind in the smiddy; Ah liked forging.

Interviewer: Yes?

Oh, Ah loved forging. But mind you, Andy, Ah wis only fourteen an Ah wis swinging the big hammer from the day that Ah went in an ye worked from eight in the morning till six at night. Ye got half an hour for dinner an ye never got a teabreak. Sometimes swinging the hammer, pumping them bellows, up an doon, all day. An ye had to pump it at the right speed to get the right heat. Ah think Ah discovered then than blacksmiths can swear. They really can swear. Even though he wis my uncle he could swear if things didn't go right. But mind you, it wis hard work.

Interviewer: So ye'd be making implements an repairing implements.

Repairing implements, making, ringing cart wheels. Making all - everything and anything wis done in the blacksmith's shop.

Interviewer: Oh yes.

The blacksmith's shop was the place, but it wis hard, hard work. Very hard work. No one realised for all they were getting, the money that they were getting for the work they were doing, it wis sweat, all day long. My uncle wis always bothered with what they - hacks on the hand, ye know? Torn apart. An he used all kinds of home cures to try an cure them

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John Urquhart (The Bogan) - Life as a blacksmith

ROSS: Urray

2000s

comics; comedians; variety; show business; smithie; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Johnny Bogan

The comedian John Urquhart, from Muir of Ord, entertained audiences throughout the Highlands and Islands for over fifty years, since his debut in 1952. He was better known as 'Johnny Bogan' or simply, 'The Bogan'. He died in November 2006. In this Moray Firth Radio audio extract from 2000 Johnny talks about his life as a blacksmith.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did ye do when ye left school then, Johnny, first?<br /> <br /> What did Ah do when Ah left school, Ah went to work with ma uncle in the blacksmith's shop.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The blacksmith's shop, there. Were ye shoeing horses? Did ye get round to that?<br /> <br /> Ah did try it, but Ah didn't like it. But Ah liked in the smiddy. Ah didn't mind in the smiddy; Ah liked forging.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes?<br /> <br /> Oh, Ah loved forging. But mind you, Andy, Ah wis only fourteen an Ah wis swinging the big hammer from the day that Ah went in an ye worked from eight in the morning till six at night. Ye got half an hour for dinner an ye never got a teabreak. Sometimes swinging the hammer, pumping them bellows, up an doon, all day. An ye had to pump it at the right speed to get the right heat. Ah think Ah discovered then than blacksmiths can swear. They really can swear. Even though he wis my uncle he could swear if things didn't go right. But mind you, it wis hard work.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So ye'd be making implements an repairing implements.<br /> <br /> Repairing implements, making, ringing cart wheels. Making all - everything and anything wis done in the blacksmith's shop. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes.<br /> <br /> The blacksmith's shop was the place, but it wis hard, hard work. Very hard work. No one realised for all they were getting, the money that they were getting for the work they were doing, it wis sweat, all day long. My uncle wis always bothered with what they - hacks on the hand, ye know? Torn apart. An he used all kinds of home cures to try an cure them