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TITLE
Hugh Miller and the Early Geologists
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_MARYFYFE_02
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Mary Fyfe
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1757
KEYWORDS
geologists
masons
Evangelicals
audio

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Born in Cromarty in 1802, Hugh Miller was a stonemason to trade. He went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. In this audio extract, Mary Fyfe talks about Miller's contribution to society. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, transmitted in 1991.

At that time not very much was written about geology; this was the time of the great naturalists and scientists such as Darwin and Murchison, who was also born on the Black Isle [Tarradale], who became a great geologist, and Sedgwick and so on. But all of those people lived in London and this was really the main difference between Hugh Miller and all of those people; they had each other to talk to and to discuss and so on, but Hugh Miller wrote about his findings and he had this great journalistic ability too. He became involved in all the affairs of Scotland, especially living in some of the conditions when he had moved, as a young man to Edinburgh, as a stonemason, in dreadful conditions and in fact became very ill and had to come home to Cromarty. He suffered from what they called the stonemason's disease; this is silicosis, the same as the miners used to have. He was also very sympathetic towards the Evangelical party. In 1843 there was the big Disruption and that was when the Free Church of Scotland was started and Hugh Miller was there at the signing of the Deed of Demission. He describes it in his books. He's really a tremendous writer. He has a wonderful gift of observation and his drawings - everything he put his hand to, he did so well

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Hugh Miller and the Early Geologists

ROSS: Cromarty

1990s

geologists; masons; Evangelicals; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Hugh Miller

Born in Cromarty in 1802, Hugh Miller was a stonemason to trade. He went on to become a prolific writer and journalist, combining his religious beliefs with a passion for geology and folklore. In this audio extract, Mary Fyfe talks about Miller's contribution to society. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, transmitted in 1991.<br /> <br /> At that time not very much was written about geology; this was the time of the great naturalists and scientists such as Darwin and Murchison, who was also born on the Black Isle [Tarradale], who became a great geologist, and Sedgwick and so on. But all of those people lived in London and this was really the main difference between Hugh Miller and all of those people; they had each other to talk to and to discuss and so on, but Hugh Miller wrote about his findings and he had this great journalistic ability too. He became involved in all the affairs of Scotland, especially living in some of the conditions when he had moved, as a young man to Edinburgh, as a stonemason, in dreadful conditions and in fact became very ill and had to come home to Cromarty. He suffered from what they called the stonemason's disease; this is silicosis, the same as the miners used to have. He was also very sympathetic towards the Evangelical party. In 1843 there was the big Disruption and that was when the Free Church of Scotland was started and Hugh Miller was there at the signing of the Deed of Demission. He describes it in his books. He's really a tremendous writer. He has a wonderful gift of observation and his drawings - everything he put his hand to, he did so well