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TITLE
The Origins of Dingwall
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ROBGIBSON_02
PLACENAME
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Dingwall
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Rob Gibson
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1776
KEYWORDS
placenames
audio

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In this audio extract, Rob Gibson talks about the origins of the placename 'Dingwall'. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.

Well Dingwall means 'Tinwald' [from the Old Norse 'Thing vollr'], it means 'the field of the courthouse. It really was the Norse centre for this area as they raided down and settled from Norway originally, and that means it's of slightly more recent origin than some of the Gaelic names. But, of course, it has its own Gaelic names; first of all to describe geographically the mouth of the Peffery, 'Inbhir Pheofharain' and also 'Baile càl', the 'town of cabbages' or 'kale' and so on. It's been a burgh since the Middle Ages but probably was founded by the Vikings because originally it's in a place which was fairly boggy. When you look at the names of the parishes round about here and the saints to whom each of the parishes is dedicated, they're all the Irish saints of the Celtic Church and so the Pictish population lived on and around this area. In Easter Ross, you know, the Pictish stones up in Nigg and at Pitcalnie and all these sort of areas, the Pictish names like Shandwick. But in this area, because Dingwall's in such a hollow, it's very unlikely that an early stage people lived in such ill-drained land and it was only when the Vikings arrived by sea and used it as a base for their sea-going activities that a town took off and a castle was built

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The Origins of Dingwall

ROSS: Dingwall

1990s

placenames; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: History of Dingwall

In this audio extract, Rob Gibson talks about the origins of the placename 'Dingwall'. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.<br /> <br /> Well Dingwall means 'Tinwald' [from the Old Norse 'Thing vollr'], it means 'the field of the courthouse. It really was the Norse centre for this area as they raided down and settled from Norway originally, and that means it's of slightly more recent origin than some of the Gaelic names. But, of course, it has its own Gaelic names; first of all to describe geographically the mouth of the Peffery, 'Inbhir Pheofharain' and also 'Baile càl', the 'town of cabbages' or 'kale' and so on. It's been a burgh since the Middle Ages but probably was founded by the Vikings because originally it's in a place which was fairly boggy. When you look at the names of the parishes round about here and the saints to whom each of the parishes is dedicated, they're all the Irish saints of the Celtic Church and so the Pictish population lived on and around this area. In Easter Ross, you know, the Pictish stones up in Nigg and at Pitcalnie and all these sort of areas, the Pictish names like Shandwick. But in this area, because Dingwall's in such a hollow, it's very unlikely that an early stage people lived in such ill-drained land and it was only when the Vikings arrived by sea and used it as a base for their sea-going activities that a town took off and a castle was built