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TITLE
Golspie Golf Club and the Sutherlands (1 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_RODHOUSTON_01
PLACENAME
Golspie
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Golspie
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Rod Houston
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1779
KEYWORDS
golf courses
sale of work
fund raising
audio

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Golspie Golf Club is situated about one mile south of Golspie village centre. Founded in 1889, it was designed by the legendary Scottish professional golfer, James Braid (1870-1950). In this audio extract, Rod Houston talks about the links between the golf club and the Sutherland family. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.

The Sutherland family have always been very closely involved with the golf club. In the days when golf clubs had patrons, the golf club was always under their patronage and the golf club here plays for the Duke of Sutherland cup annually which highlights it. The ground is still leased from the estate of Sutherland, so there's always been a relationship but it's always been a sort of come and go. There's no doubt that when old Bobbo Macrae, the erstwhile greenkeeper/professional here was sent a message by the duke to be ready to play at 2:30, Bobbo knew that this was good protocol, if not a grand chance for a game of golf, so he would duly turn up and have a game with the duke.

But, right back in the early records of the club they talk about the Duke of Sutherland cup and there's correspondence with the House of Sutherland over a huge range of matters; rabbits on the course; coastal erosion; permission for buildings. But it remains essentially nowadays a benign relationship. Not that it wasn't benign in the past. For instance, as the club developed in the early years of this century, having been founded in 1889, it then, by about 1905 or thereby, decided that it wanted to extend to eighteen holes and the whole game of golf was mushrooming at that stage. So they decided in 1908 that they would have a bazaar to raise money for golf course improvements. The Duke of Sutherland got wind of this and for some reason or other he wasn't too keen on the idea of a bazaar. He would have had his own reasons which remain a mystery. So, he wrote to the club and said, 'If you don't hold a bazaar I will give you two hundred pounds towards your course improvements' and wise men that they were with the old bird in the hand rather than the two in the bazaar, they took the two hundred pounds and scrapped the idea. So on they went with their improvements and five years later, in 1913-14, there were back planning another bazaar, as this drive to develop the course continued. So they had a bazaar; they set it all up; they had a massive event, and the Kaiser spoilt the whole thing so they gave the money to the war effort because it would have looked terrible to develop a golf course when the Great War started

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Golspie Golf Club and the Sutherlands (1 of 2)

SUTHERLAND: Golspie

1990s

golf courses; sale of work; fund raising; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Golspie Golf Club

Golspie Golf Club is situated about one mile south of Golspie village centre. Founded in 1889, it was designed by the legendary Scottish professional golfer, James Braid (1870-1950). In this audio extract, Rod Houston talks about the links between the golf club and the Sutherland family. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series.<br /> <br /> The Sutherland family have always been very closely involved with the golf club. In the days when golf clubs had patrons, the golf club was always under their patronage and the golf club here plays for the Duke of Sutherland cup annually which highlights it. The ground is still leased from the estate of Sutherland, so there's always been a relationship but it's always been a sort of come and go. There's no doubt that when old Bobbo Macrae, the erstwhile greenkeeper/professional here was sent a message by the duke to be ready to play at 2:30, Bobbo knew that this was good protocol, if not a grand chance for a game of golf, so he would duly turn up and have a game with the duke. <br /> <br /> But, right back in the early records of the club they talk about the Duke of Sutherland cup and there's correspondence with the House of Sutherland over a huge range of matters; rabbits on the course; coastal erosion; permission for buildings. But it remains essentially nowadays a benign relationship. Not that it wasn't benign in the past. For instance, as the club developed in the early years of this century, having been founded in 1889, it then, by about 1905 or thereby, decided that it wanted to extend to eighteen holes and the whole game of golf was mushrooming at that stage. So they decided in 1908 that they would have a bazaar to raise money for golf course improvements. The Duke of Sutherland got wind of this and for some reason or other he wasn't too keen on the idea of a bazaar. He would have had his own reasons which remain a mystery. So, he wrote to the club and said, 'If you don't hold a bazaar I will give you two hundred pounds towards your course improvements' and wise men that they were with the old bird in the hand rather than the two in the bazaar, they took the two hundred pounds and scrapped the idea. So on they went with their improvements and five years later, in 1913-14, there were back planning another bazaar, as this drive to develop the course continued. So they had a bazaar; they set it all up; they had a massive event, and the Kaiser spoilt the whole thing so they gave the money to the war effort because it would have looked terrible to develop a golf course when the Great War started