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TITLE
The Seagull Trust, Caledonian Canal
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_SEAGULLTRUST
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1789
KEYWORDS
canals
charities
charity
special needs
audio

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The Seagull Trust was formed in 1978 to provide free canal cruising for disabled people and to help revitalise the decaying Scottish Lowland Waterways. Today there are branches on the Union Canal, the Forth and Clyde Canal, and the Caledonian Canal. The Highland Branch of the Seagull Trust was formed in 1987. In this Moray Firth Radio audio extract from 1991, a volunteer on the Caledonian Canal talks about his involvement with the trust.

There's nothing boring about it despite the fact that we do so many trips; the canal seems to look different almost every day when you come down and, as I say, the real reward at the end of the day is how folks really enjoy themselves.

Interviewer: What's your own background? How did you get involved with the Seagull Trust?

Oh well, my own background was I use to be with the Milk Board, but my background for the sailing business is really I was involved with flying boats during the war, so that's where my experience comes from.

Interviewer: Coming on to the waterway here, actually it's a very special waterway, isn't it, the Caledonian Canal?

What has to be borne in mind by comparison with the other boats is that they're not operating on commercial waterways any longer. We are, and this is why we've got to be especially careful, you know, it's quite a bust waterway this, especially in the summer time with, you know, the big hoard of cruise boats tearing up and down, and that can be a little bit hair-raising at times.

Interviewer: Yes, especially because you're getting them when they've just taken over the boat. They're probably not too accustomed to its controls.

No, they're inclined to charge about a bit, you know, take the whole width of the canal at times, which is alright except when you get near the bridge and then it can get a little bit hair-raising on occasion.

Interviewer: But that also must add to the excitement for the people that come on the cruise?

Of course, it all gives a bit more fun to the thing.

Interviewer: Which waterways are the other boats of the Seagull Trust on?

They've got one on the canal, the Forth and Clyde Canal at Kirkintilloch and then they've another two at Ratho, at the Edinburgh side.

Interviewer: So over the three seasons, well this is the third season now you've been carrying passengers here, you must have had a fair number of people pass through, pass over the entrance to the boat here?

Yes. I think over the two seasons it'll be about eighteen hundred folks we've had, about nine hundred in each of the seasons.

Interviewer: Excellent.

And, you know, from all ages; from quite elderly to, to the youngsters, you know, of Drummond School.

Interviewer: And they all enjoy it?

Oh, they all seem to thoroughly enjoy it

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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The Seagull Trust, Caledonian Canal

1990s

canals; charities; charity; special needs; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Miscellaneous

The Seagull Trust was formed in 1978 to provide free canal cruising for disabled people and to help revitalise the decaying Scottish Lowland Waterways. Today there are branches on the Union Canal, the Forth and Clyde Canal, and the Caledonian Canal. The Highland Branch of the Seagull Trust was formed in 1987. In this Moray Firth Radio audio extract from 1991, a volunteer on the Caledonian Canal talks about his involvement with the trust.<br /> <br /> There's nothing boring about it despite the fact that we do so many trips; the canal seems to look different almost every day when you come down and, as I say, the real reward at the end of the day is how folks really enjoy themselves.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What's your own background? How did you get involved with the Seagull Trust?<br /> <br /> Oh well, my own background was I use to be with the Milk Board, but my background for the sailing business is really I was involved with flying boats during the war, so that's where my experience comes from.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Coming on to the waterway here, actually it's a very special waterway, isn't it, the Caledonian Canal?<br /> <br /> What has to be borne in mind by comparison with the other boats is that they're not operating on commercial waterways any longer. We are, and this is why we've got to be especially careful, you know, it's quite a bust waterway this, especially in the summer time with, you know, the big hoard of cruise boats tearing up and down, and that can be a little bit hair-raising at times.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, especially because you're getting them when they've just taken over the boat. They're probably not too accustomed to its controls.<br /> <br /> No, they're inclined to charge about a bit, you know, take the whole width of the canal at times, which is alright except when you get near the bridge and then it can get a little bit hair-raising on occasion.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: But that also must add to the excitement for the people that come on the cruise?<br /> <br /> Of course, it all gives a bit more fun to the thing.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Which waterways are the other boats of the Seagull Trust on?<br /> <br /> They've got one on the canal, the Forth and Clyde Canal at Kirkintilloch and then they've another two at Ratho, at the Edinburgh side.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So over the three seasons, well this is the third season now you've been carrying passengers here, you must have had a fair number of people pass through, pass over the entrance to the boat here?<br /> <br /> Yes. I think over the two seasons it'll be about eighteen hundred folks we've had, about nine hundred in each of the seasons.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Excellent.<br /> <br /> And, you know, from all ages; from quite elderly to, to the youngsters, you know, of Drummond School.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And they all enjoy it?<br /> <br /> Oh, they all seem to thoroughly enjoy it