Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Deer Stalking in the Corrieyairack (2 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ALANMACINTYRE_02
PLACENAME
Corrieyairack
DISTRICT
Laggan
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Laggan
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Alan MacIntyre
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1803
KEYWORDS
stalkers
estates
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Corrieyairack Hill lies to the southwestern end of the Monadhliath Mountains in the Badenoch and Strathspey district of the Scottish Highlands. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair talks to Alan MacIntyre, a deer stalker in the Corrieyairack area.

Alan: At this time o the year they're, they're droppin' their antlers.

Bill: Now, you're just lifting up an antler now.

Alan: Then they've been chewin' that too.

Bill: How do they chew the antlers?

Alan: Well, it must be somethin' that they want out o them. They must get some good out o that, ye know? Ah don't know really what good they get out o it, but ye see, they do that a lot like, ye know? They must get - Ah don't know - is it calcium or what they get out o it?

Bill: You don't often see red deer antlers lying around the hill?

Alan: Not really, we get them jist where, droppin' off maybe, where the - Ah see another one lyin' over there.

Bill: Oh, you can see it there sticking up quite distinctly there on the grass. Seems quite a large one here.

Alan: It does, aye.

Bill: Do they usually drop them full size or are they pretty small, bits and pieces, before they come down here with them?

Alan: Naw, ye get big horns jist, ye know, jist - That's aboot - Ye see, they huvnae chewed that one at all, it's - Well, they have tried to -

Bill: One, two, three, four, a five-pointer. So it could be a, what, about a ten-pointer stag?

Alan: That would probably be a ten-pointer, that would - Ye would say that one wis goin back. See how it's sittin short on that point there?

Bill: Yes. Oh, here's another one.

Alan: That one's fairly fresh off; ye can see the blood still round the root. Ah think that one's been off a whiley longer.

Bill: Oh, you can tell by the one that's fresh off. It's quite white, actually, with the blood round the, the, as you say, the root.

Alan: The root. That's it. In fact that looks like a...

Bill: How long do you think that one's been off?

Alan: ...that's like a matcher.

Bill: Yes, it certainly does. It is a pair.

Alan: Ah'd say it was a pair, aye.

Bill: Well, there you are; going out onto the hill and finding two antlers and there they are, a perfect matching pair.

Alan: Off the same stag, aye.

Bill: Is that a normal thing for you to find like this, Alan?

Alan: It's not really, no. It's, that's quite - It's not often ye get the two that ye could say wis - that would match like that, ye know?

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Deer Stalking in the Corrieyairack (2 of 2)

INVERNESS: Laggan

1980s; 1990s

stalkers; estates; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Deer

Corrieyairack Hill lies to the southwestern end of the Monadhliath Mountains in the Badenoch and Strathspey district of the Scottish Highlands. In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair talks to Alan MacIntyre, a deer stalker in the Corrieyairack area. <br /> <br /> Alan: At this time o the year they're, they're droppin' their antlers. <br /> <br /> Bill: Now, you're just lifting up an antler now.<br /> <br /> Alan: Then they've been chewin' that too. <br /> <br /> Bill: How do they chew the antlers?<br /> <br /> Alan: Well, it must be somethin' that they want out o them. They must get some good out o that, ye know? Ah don't know really what good they get out o it, but ye see, they do that a lot like, ye know? They must get - Ah don't know - is it calcium or what they get out o it?<br /> <br /> Bill: You don't often see red deer antlers lying around the hill?<br /> <br /> Alan: Not really, we get them jist where, droppin' off maybe, where the - Ah see another one lyin' over there.<br /> <br /> Bill: Oh, you can see it there sticking up quite distinctly there on the grass. Seems quite a large one here.<br /> <br /> Alan: It does, aye.<br /> <br /> Bill: Do they usually drop them full size or are they pretty small, bits and pieces, before they come down here with them?<br /> <br /> Alan: Naw, ye get big horns jist, ye know, jist - That's aboot - Ye see, they huvnae chewed that one at all, it's - Well, they have tried to - <br /> <br /> Bill: One, two, three, four, a five-pointer. So it could be a, what, about a ten-pointer stag?<br /> <br /> Alan: That would probably be a ten-pointer, that would - Ye would say that one wis goin back. See how it's sittin short on that point there?<br /> <br /> Bill: Yes. Oh, here's another one. <br /> <br /> Alan: That one's fairly fresh off; ye can see the blood still round the root. Ah think that one's been off a whiley longer.<br /> <br /> Bill: Oh, you can tell by the one that's fresh off. It's quite white, actually, with the blood round the, the, as you say, the root. <br /> <br /> Alan: The root. That's it. In fact that looks like a...<br /> <br /> Bill: How long do you think that one's been off?<br /> <br /> Alan: ...that's like a matcher.<br /> <br /> Bill: Yes, it certainly does. It is a pair.<br /> <br /> Alan: Ah'd say it was a pair, aye.<br /> <br /> Bill: Well, there you are; going out onto the hill and finding two antlers and there they are, a perfect matching pair. <br /> <br /> Alan: Off the same stag, aye.<br /> <br /> Bill: Is that a normal thing for you to find like this, Alan?<br /> <br /> Alan: It's not really, no. It's, that's quite - It's not often ye get the two that ye could say wis - that would match like that, ye know?