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TITLE
Invertebrates in the Works of Martin Martin
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_07
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1814
KEYWORDS
botany
zoology
travelogues
gazetteers
insects
Western Isles
audio

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Martin Martin's 'A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland' (1703) and 'A Voyage to St Kilda' (1698) are amongst the first printed works describing the life, culture and beliefs of the people of the Hebrides. In this audio extract from 1996, Skye naturalist - Andrew Currie - identifies many of the invertebrate species mentioned in Martin's works.

The marine invertebrates reflect the edible nature of the species with the exception of the blue-rayed limpet. My inclusion of the queen scallop is something of a guess but Martin does refer to 'pectenes, some blue, and some of orange colours'. A very few non-marine invertebrates were recorded. Perhaps the most exciting is the earliest record of the warble fly, not so named however, but immediately identified by the local vet, Donald John MacLennan. Martin's description refers to Pabbay and goes thus, 'In the dog-days there is a big fly on this isle which infests the cows and makes them run up and down, discomposes them exceedingly, and hinders their feeding insomuch that they must be brought out of the isle to the Isle of Skye'. A. R. Waterston, in his 1981 paper on 'Non marine invertebrates in the Outer Hebrides', did not record the warble fly but he report on the freshwater pearl mussel or black mussel. Martin Martin was the first to report these from the Outer Hebrides and in Lewis. He also reports them in Skye, Mull, and the Inner Hebrides. These truly are remarkable first records

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Invertebrates in the Works of Martin Martin

1980s; 1990s

botany; zoology; travelogues; gazetteers; insects; Western Isles; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Martin Martin

Martin Martin's 'A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland' (1703) and 'A Voyage to St Kilda' (1698) are amongst the first printed works describing the life, culture and beliefs of the people of the Hebrides. In this audio extract from 1996, Skye naturalist - Andrew Currie - identifies many of the invertebrate species mentioned in Martin's works.<br /> <br /> The marine invertebrates reflect the edible nature of the species with the exception of the blue-rayed limpet. My inclusion of the queen scallop is something of a guess but Martin does refer to 'pectenes, some blue, and some of orange colours'. A very few non-marine invertebrates were recorded. Perhaps the most exciting is the earliest record of the warble fly, not so named however, but immediately identified by the local vet, Donald John MacLennan. Martin's description refers to Pabbay and goes thus, 'In the dog-days there is a big fly on this isle which infests the cows and makes them run up and down, discomposes them exceedingly, and hinders their feeding insomuch that they must be brought out of the isle to the Isle of Skye'. A. R. Waterston, in his 1981 paper on 'Non marine invertebrates in the Outer Hebrides', did not record the warble fly but he report on the freshwater pearl mussel or black mussel. Martin Martin was the first to report these from the Outer Hebrides and in Lewis. He also reports them in Skye, Mull, and the Inner Hebrides. These truly are remarkable first records