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TITLE
Wild Habitats as Described by Martin Martin
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_09
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1817
KEYWORDS
botany
zoology
travelogues
gazetteers
Western Isles
landscapes
audio

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Martin Martin's 'A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland' (1703) and 'A Voyage to St Kilda' (1698) are amongst the first printed works describing the life, culture and beliefs of the people of the Hebrides. In this audio extract from 1996, Skye naturalist - Andrew Currie - reflects on the value of Martin's work with regards to current conservation issues.

Conservation is nowadays seen in terms of wild habitats and Martin Martin identified at least eleven of these from some thirty-nine islands. Of special significance are the seal and bird islands which became desired destinations for naturalists, yachtsmen and other travellers. When dealing with fish populations I have already looked at freshwater lochs, rivers and streams and also the brackish water habitats first spotted by Martin. Machair is also described, though not by that name, from several locations. Stewart Angus contributed a useful paper on the meaning of machair in 1993 including Martin's references. Upland and lowland heath are habitats only implied in the passing, and Martin even records an orchard on the isle of Barra.

Martin Martin made a valuable contribution to the broad spectrum of wildlife and wild habitats, especially considering that this was written three hundred years ago. Let no one underestimate the place of Martin in the history of natural history in the Hebrides

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Wild Habitats as Described by Martin Martin

1980s; 1990s

botany; zoology; travelogues; gazetteers; Western Isles; landscapes; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Martin Martin

Martin Martin's 'A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland' (1703) and 'A Voyage to St Kilda' (1698) are amongst the first printed works describing the life, culture and beliefs of the people of the Hebrides. In this audio extract from 1996, Skye naturalist - Andrew Currie - reflects on the value of Martin's work with regards to current conservation issues.<br /> <br /> Conservation is nowadays seen in terms of wild habitats and Martin Martin identified at least eleven of these from some thirty-nine islands. Of special significance are the seal and bird islands which became desired destinations for naturalists, yachtsmen and other travellers. When dealing with fish populations I have already looked at freshwater lochs, rivers and streams and also the brackish water habitats first spotted by Martin. Machair is also described, though not by that name, from several locations. Stewart Angus contributed a useful paper on the meaning of machair in 1993 including Martin's references. Upland and lowland heath are habitats only implied in the passing, and Martin even records an orchard on the isle of Barra.<br /> <br /> Martin Martin made a valuable contribution to the broad spectrum of wildlife and wild habitats, especially considering that this was written three hundred years ago. Let no one underestimate the place of Martin in the history of natural history in the Hebrides