Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Plants and wildlife, Black Lochs, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_11
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1820
KEYWORDS
landscapes
landscape
ornithology
botany
flora
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the plants and wildlife to be found, in and around the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.

One of the things that's special that grows in the loch is a few plants of the very rare pipewort, which is a plant, really, it's an American plant, which is present in one or two locations in the northwest of Scotland, mainly on Skye, with tiny examples elsewhere, and you'll see it just growing in the fringes of the loch here, and it's quite a rarity. The main place to see it, of course, is over at Sligachan, which is quite a distance from here. This is one of the outlying areas where it appears and we don't know how it appeared here, but it is a North American species and one can speculate as to whether it was brought over by birds on the move, or by some other means. And then there's the little club moss, also, the fir club moss, that you would see growing around in amongst the heather; a tiny little thing like a small pine tree. This is why it's called the fir club moss.

Interviewer: Well, the lochs themselves, there seems quite a few of them really, all with their little islands. I mean, we noticed quite a few as we came to the shore of the one we're alongside at the moment?

Yes, this is one of the medium sized ones. There are a number - I've never counted them - but there's a number of quite small ones. We'll walk over in a moment or two to one of the really big ones which is locally said to be quite good for fishing trout in and we can see what that one looks like. This is the sort of area too where you might expect to see otters now and again. I've not seen an otter here recently but I have in the past heard reports of them being here. I've even had a report of an osprey being seen.

Interviewer: Is that right?

A few years ago, yes. Somebody out very early in the morning saw an osprey hunting on the moors round about here. So even these brown, bare, desolate looking moors have their own types of wildlife if you're knowledgeable enough and know what to look for

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Plants and wildlife, Black Lochs, Skye

INVERNESS

1980s; 1990s

landscapes; landscape; ornithology; botany; flora; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the plants and wildlife to be found, in and around the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.<br /> <br /> One of the things that's special that grows in the loch is a few plants of the very rare pipewort, which is a plant, really, it's an American plant, which is present in one or two locations in the northwest of Scotland, mainly on Skye, with tiny examples elsewhere, and you'll see it just growing in the fringes of the loch here, and it's quite a rarity. The main place to see it, of course, is over at Sligachan, which is quite a distance from here. This is one of the outlying areas where it appears and we don't know how it appeared here, but it is a North American species and one can speculate as to whether it was brought over by birds on the move, or by some other means. And then there's the little club moss, also, the fir club moss, that you would see growing around in amongst the heather; a tiny little thing like a small pine tree. This is why it's called the fir club moss.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, the lochs themselves, there seems quite a few of them really, all with their little islands. I mean, we noticed quite a few as we came to the shore of the one we're alongside at the moment?<br /> <br /> Yes, this is one of the medium sized ones. There are a number - I've never counted them - but there's a number of quite small ones. We'll walk over in a moment or two to one of the really big ones which is locally said to be quite good for fishing trout in and we can see what that one looks like. This is the sort of area too where you might expect to see otters now and again. I've not seen an otter here recently but I have in the past heard reports of them being here. I've even had a report of an osprey being seen.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Is that right?<br /> <br /> A few years ago, yes. Somebody out very early in the morning saw an osprey hunting on the moors round about here. So even these brown, bare, desolate looking moors have their own types of wildlife if you're knowledgeable enough and know what to look for