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TITLE
Trees and plants, Black Lochs, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_12
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1821
KEYWORDS
landscapes
landscape
flora
botany
audio

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In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the vegetation to be found, in and around the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.

Interviewer: I notice on the islands the vegetation, the trees, are - are quite short really. They're really blown also by the prevailing winds and shaped by the - by the winds -

Yes.

Interviewer: - to a certain extent and I doubt if they're more than, what, ten feet high at the very most?

Ten to fifteen feet high at the most I would say. This is because they're mainly birch trees, a few rowan, and a few hazel scrub. There'll be things like dog rose as well and maybe brambles on the island and, of course, the interesting thing on some of these is the royal fern is on these islands. But none of these trees will never grow much higher than they are just now. They're not tall-growing forest trees, they're simply low scrubby examples of the sort of native trees that would be here at one time. Perhaps a few willows as well.

Interviewer: But tell me something about this royal fern.

Royal fern is a rather splendid looking fern that grows on the shores of quite a number of the sea - of the freshwater lochs of this sort on Skye. In fact, although in most parts of the country it's relatively rare, there's a lot of it on Skye. It's died back of course and at this time of the year you're only seeing the brown foliage but it's a very splendid plant; grows to about two foot high and I know sea cliffs on the Skye coastline where it's hanging in great quantities.

Interviewer: Yes.

But this island situation is one that it likes very, very much

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Trees and plants, Black Lochs, Skye

INVERNESS

1980s; 1990s

landscapes; landscape; flora; botany; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the vegetation to be found, in and around the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I notice on the islands the vegetation, the trees, are - are quite short really. They're really blown also by the prevailing winds and shaped by the - by the winds -<br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: - to a certain extent and I doubt if they're more than, what, ten feet high at the very most?<br /> <br /> Ten to fifteen feet high at the most I would say. This is because they're mainly birch trees, a few rowan, and a few hazel scrub. There'll be things like dog rose as well and maybe brambles on the island and, of course, the interesting thing on some of these is the royal fern is on these islands. But none of these trees will never grow much higher than they are just now. They're not tall-growing forest trees, they're simply low scrubby examples of the sort of native trees that would be here at one time. Perhaps a few willows as well.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: But tell me something about this royal fern.<br /> <br /> Royal fern is a rather splendid looking fern that grows on the shores of quite a number of the sea - of the freshwater lochs of this sort on Skye. In fact, although in most parts of the country it's relatively rare, there's a lot of it on Skye. It's died back of course and at this time of the year you're only seeing the brown foliage but it's a very splendid plant; grows to about two foot high and I know sea cliffs on the Skye coastline where it's hanging in great quantities.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> But this island situation is one that it likes very, very much