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TITLE
Vegetation in the Black Lochs area, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_13
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1823
KEYWORDS
landscapes
landscape
botany
flora
reeds
audio

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In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the vegetation to be found in the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.

Interviewer: There's not very much vegetation to be seen. You know, there's no reed beds, or rushes or anything, you know, that you perhaps see on some Highland lochs.

Well, you have various sorts of lochs. This is an example of a very acid loch, and except at perhaps the inlet areas and the outflow, where you might find a bit of vegetation and rushes and perhaps something else more interesting, you wouldn't expect a great deal of vegetation. Of course, in the summer you can walk around it and you can see things like the lesser spearwort growing round the shores of the loch here, but - and the blue water lobelia grows here. And, you don't see a trace of it just now, but floating on the surface of the water, the white water lily. And the bogbean. But, of course, all of that has died back. If you look down there you can see the dead stumps of what has been vegetation. So in the summer period there would be a lot more vegetation visible on this loch. But there are other lochs where there's a bit of influence of lime, or calcium.

Interviewer: Within this loch system?

Not within this complex, no. I'm thinking of other parts of Skye. For example, in the limestone area near Kilbride, you would find much, much richer lochs there, with lime loving plants and these are all totally absent from here, of course

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Vegetation in the Black Lochs area, Skye

INVERNESS

1980s; 1990s

landscapes; landscape; botany; flora; reeds; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the vegetation to be found in the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There's not very much vegetation to be seen. You know, there's no reed beds, or rushes or anything, you know, that you perhaps see on some Highland lochs.<br /> <br /> Well, you have various sorts of lochs. This is an example of a very acid loch, and except at perhaps the inlet areas and the outflow, where you might find a bit of vegetation and rushes and perhaps something else more interesting, you wouldn't expect a great deal of vegetation. Of course, in the summer you can walk around it and you can see things like the lesser spearwort growing round the shores of the loch here, but - and the blue water lobelia grows here. And, you don't see a trace of it just now, but floating on the surface of the water, the white water lily. And the bogbean. But, of course, all of that has died back. If you look down there you can see the dead stumps of what has been vegetation. So in the summer period there would be a lot more vegetation visible on this loch. But there are other lochs where there's a bit of influence of lime, or calcium.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Within this loch system?<br /> <br /> Not within this complex, no. I'm thinking of other parts of Skye. For example, in the limestone area near Kilbride, you would find much, much richer lochs there, with lime loving plants and these are all totally absent from here, of course