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TITLE
Geology in the Black Lochs area, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_14
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1824
KEYWORDS
landscapes
landscape
glaciers
sedges
audio

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In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the geology and vegetation of the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.

And on the way to where we are now standing -

Interviewer: Yes

- you'll have seen these rocky outcrops of Torridonian sandstone; red coloured rock, the sort of rock that you would see over near the Ben Eighe Natural Nature Reserve, that sort of area, all up the west coast of Scotland there. So this is the basic rock type that gives rise to the acid conditions of the peat here and the acid of the loch itself. You sometimes see a heron perched on these rocks at the edge of the loch here. We've not seen one today. The only thing we've seen is a couple of hooded crows and there's plenty of these about. You'll notice also, Bill, that the islands are bigger on this loch and the trees are a bit higher. I think perhaps it's a wee bit sheltered at the back of that low hill beyond. There's just a little bit more shelter here than there was in the first area that we were standing at.

Interviewer: Very unusual little humps. D'you see them there, on the side of the loch? Is that to do with glaciation?

Yes, these are glacial moraines, moraine hummocks, and you'll see a scattering of them right round a whole - almost ninety-five degrees of the landscape in front of us is covered with these glacial hummocks. Under that'll be just heaps of glacier gravel and till as they were deposited. And, of course, since then the vegetation and the peat has taken up. And in the hollows between the hummocks you have these little lochans, or else peaty pools, and in one area further over here quite an extensive hollow, which has filled up with a peat pool complex. And there's at least two different forms of plant there; there is the grass, the Molinia, the purple moor grass, which is the whiter of the two, and then the darker one's not actually a grass at all, it's closer to the sedge family; a thing called the deer grass which has a more russet colour. And a botanist can pick these out even from half a mile away. They show out quite well at this time of the year

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Geology in the Black Lochs area, Skye

INVERNESS

1980s; 1990s

landscapes; landscape; glaciers; sedges; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the geology and vegetation of the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.<br /> <br /> And on the way to where we are now standing -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes<br /> <br /> - you'll have seen these rocky outcrops of Torridonian sandstone; red coloured rock, the sort of rock that you would see over near the Ben Eighe Natural Nature Reserve, that sort of area, all up the west coast of Scotland there. So this is the basic rock type that gives rise to the acid conditions of the peat here and the acid of the loch itself. You sometimes see a heron perched on these rocks at the edge of the loch here. We've not seen one today. The only thing we've seen is a couple of hooded crows and there's plenty of these about. You'll notice also, Bill, that the islands are bigger on this loch and the trees are a bit higher. I think perhaps it's a wee bit sheltered at the back of that low hill beyond. There's just a little bit more shelter here than there was in the first area that we were standing at.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Very unusual little humps. D'you see them there, on the side of the loch? Is that to do with glaciation?<br /> <br /> Yes, these are glacial moraines, moraine hummocks, and you'll see a scattering of them right round a whole - almost ninety-five degrees of the landscape in front of us is covered with these glacial hummocks. Under that'll be just heaps of glacier gravel and till as they were deposited. And, of course, since then the vegetation and the peat has taken up. And in the hollows between the hummocks you have these little lochans, or else peaty pools, and in one area further over here quite an extensive hollow, which has filled up with a peat pool complex. And there's at least two different forms of plant there; there is the grass, the Molinia, the purple moor grass, which is the whiter of the two, and then the darker one's not actually a grass at all, it's closer to the sedge family; a thing called the deer grass which has a more russet colour. And a botanist can pick these out even from half a mile away. They show out quite well at this time of the year