Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Peat formation, Black Lochs, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_15
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1826
KEYWORDS
landscapes
landscape
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the formation of peat in the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.

The peat is widespread everywhere because of the moist nature of the climate and sometimes the peat's only an inch or two thick, but in these hollows, it's sometimes a couple of feet thick. And then there is the more extensive area further over where you have probably six or seven or eight feet of peat, with patterns of pools developing. So, the peat develops according to the nature of the local terrain; if there are deeper hollows between the lochs where the water is held, in some cases they fill with open water, in other cases there has, in the past, been open water but the vegetation's taken over and it's grown up into small examples of tiny raised bogs, and it continues to grow as the vegetation grows and dies back; you get a slow accumulation of peat on an annual basis.

And you can find examples like this over other parts of Skye, and indeed, this is one of the best areas on Skye for this particular type of peatland habitat. But, when you go into Scotland, on the mainland, places like Caithness and Sutherland, areas like the Knockfin Heights and so on, and if you go down even to Lochaber, places like Claish Moss, you have these very vast tracts of peatland which have developed and they grow these - they develop these extraordinary pattern of pools - linear pools and irregular shaped pools. This happens to be one of the best examples on Skye of that type of habitat which is probably more widespread and better developed on mainland Scotland

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Peat formation, Black Lochs, Skye

INVERNESS

1980s; 1990s

landscapes; landscape; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the formation of peat in the Black Lochs area, between Broadford and Armadale.<br /> <br /> The peat is widespread everywhere because of the moist nature of the climate and sometimes the peat's only an inch or two thick, but in these hollows, it's sometimes a couple of feet thick. And then there is the more extensive area further over where you have probably six or seven or eight feet of peat, with patterns of pools developing. So, the peat develops according to the nature of the local terrain; if there are deeper hollows between the lochs where the water is held, in some cases they fill with open water, in other cases there has, in the past, been open water but the vegetation's taken over and it's grown up into small examples of tiny raised bogs, and it continues to grow as the vegetation grows and dies back; you get a slow accumulation of peat on an annual basis. <br /> <br /> And you can find examples like this over other parts of Skye, and indeed, this is one of the best areas on Skye for this particular type of peatland habitat. But, when you go into Scotland, on the mainland, places like Caithness and Sutherland, areas like the Knockfin Heights and so on, and if you go down even to Lochaber, places like Claish Moss, you have these very vast tracts of peatland which have developed and they grow these - they develop these extraordinary pattern of pools - linear pools and irregular shaped pools. This happens to be one of the best examples on Skye of that type of habitat which is probably more widespread and better developed on mainland Scotland