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TITLE
Flora in Strath Suardal, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_18
PLACENAME
Strath Suardal
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1830
KEYWORDS
vegetation
hyacinths
violets
audio

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In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the existing flora and the changes in land use, in and around Strath Suardal, southwest of Broadford.

This particular part of the wood that we're in is hazel scrub and there just in front of you there, are the many stemmed branches of hazel. The foliage is just unfolding because it's the spring.

Interviewer: It's a lovely fresh green.

It's a beautiful fresh green and, of course, there are birds nesting in amongst these trees now. It's super. Up to the left are the birch trees which we mentioned earlier on. Now, if you look at the ground round about our feet, we're surrounded by flowers, wild flowers. For example, the primroses are everywhere just now, in full bloom; the beautiful pale yellow colours of the primroses in flower. But you'll also see a number of different purple flowers about. There's a dog violet, for example, flowering down there and further over you can see the flowers of the wild hyacinth. Now, if I was on my hands and knees here, I could point out probably twenty or thirty different sorts of plants around here; the pig nut, the earth nut, is growing roundabout here and so on. There's even the fronds of early bracken coming through. Now, if you look downhill through amongst the trees there, look at all the moss-covered boulders and these little boulders that are sticking out there are all a limestone; you can see that greyish rock -

Interviewer: Yes, yes.

- and this gives you a tremendous enrichment of the surrounding vegetation. But, another point that I mentioned earlier on is that this area has been used by people for - down through the centuries. Look at that old turf dyke, you see? That's been built by early stalksmen and it's survived as a historic remnant within this bit of woodland. So, we have a combination here of current day land use, of the historical evidence of earlier land use, and a tremendous natural wildlife interest

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Flora in Strath Suardal, Skye

INVERNESS: Strath

1980s; 1990s

vegetation; hyacinths; violets; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie, talks to Bill Sinclair about the existing flora and the changes in land use, in and around Strath Suardal, southwest of Broadford.<br /> <br /> This particular part of the wood that we're in is hazel scrub and there just in front of you there, are the many stemmed branches of hazel. The foliage is just unfolding because it's the spring. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: It's a lovely fresh green.<br /> <br /> It's a beautiful fresh green and, of course, there are birds nesting in amongst these trees now. It's super. Up to the left are the birch trees which we mentioned earlier on. Now, if you look at the ground round about our feet, we're surrounded by flowers, wild flowers. For example, the primroses are everywhere just now, in full bloom; the beautiful pale yellow colours of the primroses in flower. But you'll also see a number of different purple flowers about. There's a dog violet, for example, flowering down there and further over you can see the flowers of the wild hyacinth. Now, if I was on my hands and knees here, I could point out probably twenty or thirty different sorts of plants around here; the pig nut, the earth nut, is growing roundabout here and so on. There's even the fronds of early bracken coming through. Now, if you look downhill through amongst the trees there, look at all the moss-covered boulders and these little boulders that are sticking out there are all a limestone; you can see that greyish rock - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, yes.<br /> <br /> - and this gives you a tremendous enrichment of the surrounding vegetation. But, another point that I mentioned earlier on is that this area has been used by people for - down through the centuries. Look at that old turf dyke, you see? That's been built by early stalksmen and it's survived as a historic remnant within this bit of woodland. So, we have a combination here of current day land use, of the historical evidence of earlier land use, and a tremendous natural wildlife interest