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TITLE
Reed beds and lazy-beds, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANDREWCURRIE_19
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Andrew Currie
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1832
KEYWORDS
reeds
lazybed
lazybeds
audio

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In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie talks to Bill Sinclair about reed beds and the 'lazy-bed' cultivation method, near Loch Kilchrist, southwest of Broadford.

Interviewer: Now, here we are just on the roadside looking over onto the loch. What's the name of this one?

This is Loch Kilchrist [Cill Chriosd].

Interviewer: Named after the - after - obviously after the church?

After the, after the churchyard that we spoke about earlier on. And it is a completely natural loch; it's a limestone loch, by which I mean it's enriched; the water that flows into it is enriched by the limestone geology of the area.

Interviewer: There's a good reed bed there, isn't there? On the -

A very good reed bed.

Interviewer: - on the right.

And that's an area where you'll see the little grebe, or the dabchick, nesting. And look at - to our left here - lazy-beds. We were talking about these a moment ago.

Interviewer: Oh, yes, Oh there's a very good example there.

Some very good examples of lazy-beds, with the little raised areas that have been cultivated at one time, and in between, the slightly hollow, wetter areas where the drainage was taking place. And this tells us that a hundred years, perhaps more, ago, people were actually cultivating and taking a small crop off this land here

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Reed beds and lazy-beds, Skye

INVERNESS: Strath

1980s; 1990s

reeds; lazybed; lazybeds; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Andrew Currie, Skye Naturalist

In this audio extract, Skye naturalist, Andrew Currie talks to Bill Sinclair about reed beds and the 'lazy-bed' cultivation method, near Loch Kilchrist, southwest of Broadford. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, here we are just on the roadside looking over onto the loch. What's the name of this one?<br /> <br /> This is Loch Kilchrist [Cill Chriosd].<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Named after the - after - obviously after the church?<br /> <br /> After the, after the churchyard that we spoke about earlier on. And it is a completely natural loch; it's a limestone loch, by which I mean it's enriched; the water that flows into it is enriched by the limestone geology of the area.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: There's a good reed bed there, isn't there? On the - <br /> <br /> A very good reed bed.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: - on the right.<br /> <br /> And that's an area where you'll see the little grebe, or the dabchick, nesting. And look at - to our left here - lazy-beds. We were talking about these a moment ago.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, yes, Oh there's a very good example there.<br /> <br /> Some very good examples of lazy-beds, with the little raised areas that have been cultivated at one time, and in between, the slightly hollow, wetter areas where the drainage was taking place. And this tells us that a hundred years, perhaps more, ago, people were actually cultivating and taking a small crop off this land here