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TITLE
Memories of Corran Ferry (2 of 6)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANNEMACKINTOSH_02
PLACENAME
Corran
DISTRICT
Ardnamurchan
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Ardgour
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Anne Mackintosh
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1833
KEYWORDS
ferries
markets
droving
car ferries
audio

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The Corran Ferry crosses the Corran Narrows in Loch Linnhe, nine miles south of Fort William. The eastern slipway at Nether Lochaber links with the A82 north to Fort William, or south to Ballachulish and Glencoe. The western slipway at Ardgour provides direct access to Ardnamurchan, Morvern and Moidart. The ferry is on an ancient drove route to Central Scotland and is one of the few crossings still in operation today.

In this audio extract, Anne Mackintosh, daughter of former Corran Ferry operator, Jimmy Mackintosh, recalls how her father won the contract for the car ferry.

In 1934, the county councils of both Inverness and Argyll advertised the ferrying rights for rent -

Interviewer: Yes.

- on condition that the successful applicant would undertake to put a car ferry into operation. By this time traffic was increasing in the Highlands a little and - both commercial and private - and roads, of course, had improved, and my father put in an offer to put a car ferry on and he was the successful applicant. And I can very well remember the very first boat that came here and it was an old - well, I suppose it looked like an old tub; one engine at the back and the ferryman standing out in the open. No deck on the boat and there was a pillar up the centre which held the turntable, and it only took one car. But, of course, it didn't - you didn't need a bigger boat in those days because the -

Interviewer: Wouldn't be very many cars.

No, there weren't very many cars and I suppose it would be busier in the summer time, especially when the landowners came to spend their holidays in their - do their - for their shooting and fishing in the Ardnamurchan Peninsula

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Memories of Corran Ferry (2 of 6)

ARGYLL: Ardgour

1980s; 1990s

ferries; markets; droving; car ferries; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Corran Ferry

The Corran Ferry crosses the Corran Narrows in Loch Linnhe, nine miles south of Fort William. The eastern slipway at Nether Lochaber links with the A82 north to Fort William, or south to Ballachulish and Glencoe. The western slipway at Ardgour provides direct access to Ardnamurchan, Morvern and Moidart. The ferry is on an ancient drove route to Central Scotland and is one of the few crossings still in operation today. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract, Anne Mackintosh, daughter of former Corran Ferry operator, Jimmy Mackintosh, recalls how her father won the contract for the car ferry.<br /> <br /> In 1934, the county councils of both Inverness and Argyll advertised the ferrying rights for rent - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> - on condition that the successful applicant would undertake to put a car ferry into operation. By this time traffic was increasing in the Highlands a little and - both commercial and private - and roads, of course, had improved, and my father put in an offer to put a car ferry on and he was the successful applicant. And I can very well remember the very first boat that came here and it was an old - well, I suppose it looked like an old tub; one engine at the back and the ferryman standing out in the open. No deck on the boat and there was a pillar up the centre which held the turntable, and it only took one car. But, of course, it didn't - you didn't need a bigger boat in those days because the - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Wouldn't be very many cars.<br /> <br /> No, there weren't very many cars and I suppose it would be busier in the summer time, especially when the landowners came to spend their holidays in their - do their - for their shooting and fishing in the Ardnamurchan Peninsula