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TITLE
Memories of Corran Ferry (6 of 6)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ANNEMACKINTOSH_06
PLACENAME
Corran
DISTRICT
Ardnamurchan
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Ardgour
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Anne Mackintosh
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1839
KEYWORDS
ferries
markets
droving
audio

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The Corran Ferry crosses the Corran Narrows in Loch Linnhe, nine miles south of Fort William. The eastern slipway at Nether Lochaber links with the A82 north to Fort William, or south to Ballachulish and Glencoe. The western slipway at Ardgour provides direct access to Ardnamurchan, Morvern and Moidart. The ferry is on an ancient drove route to Central Scotland and is one of the few crossings still in operation today.

In this audio extract, Anne Mackintosh, daughter of former Corran Ferry operator, Jimmy Mackintosh, relates some amusing anecdotes concerning the ferry.

We sometimes get people crossing here thinking that they're crossing Ballachulish Ferry. They either don't read their maps properly, or they are using an old map which still shows Ballachulish Ferry, knowing that there's a bridge there now. And they may be fifteen, thirty miles away from the ferry on the other side when they suddenly realise that they still haven't reached Glencoe and their intentions is to be on the road south. Then they turn up back at the ferry and they get very annoyed to be charged for coming back again. They think they ought to get back free, although it's been their own mistake going across here.

Interviewer: Perhaps they've been queuing for hours to get across?

Oh yes. One man came back one night in a great state, about eleven o'clock, to the ferryman, knocked him up and said would he not get the boat out to take him across? And he was towing a caravan too. He could easily just stop at the roadside and spend the night in his caravan and cross first thing in the morning but he had gone about thirty-five miles before he realised he was on the wrong road.

Interviewer: Any other funny stories or things that's happened in the past?

Oh well, there's plenty funny stories that I wouldn't like to repeat.

Interviewer: Let's have something without any names coming into it.

Well, one man who had been imbibing a bit too much in the bar here, walked down to the ferry and didn't wait until the boat was right in and stepped off the jetty and landed in the water, between the boat and the jetty. And he had spent his money in vain; his quick dip in the water soon sobered him up! Another day somebody came along, got onto the boat and asked the ferrymen if that was the Cuillins on the other side and he couldn't be convinced that he wasn't crossing over to Skye. Just because it was a ferry, they all think that they're going over to Skye because I think this is the ferry they hear more about. Oh, I'm sure the ferrymen have plenty of laughs to tell

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Memories of Corran Ferry (6 of 6)

ARGYLL: Ardgour

1980s; 1990s

ferries; markets; droving; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Corran Ferry

The Corran Ferry crosses the Corran Narrows in Loch Linnhe, nine miles south of Fort William. The eastern slipway at Nether Lochaber links with the A82 north to Fort William, or south to Ballachulish and Glencoe. The western slipway at Ardgour provides direct access to Ardnamurchan, Morvern and Moidart. The ferry is on an ancient drove route to Central Scotland and is one of the few crossings still in operation today. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract, Anne Mackintosh, daughter of former Corran Ferry operator, Jimmy Mackintosh, relates some amusing anecdotes concerning the ferry.<br /> <br /> We sometimes get people crossing here thinking that they're crossing Ballachulish Ferry. They either don't read their maps properly, or they are using an old map which still shows Ballachulish Ferry, knowing that there's a bridge there now. And they may be fifteen, thirty miles away from the ferry on the other side when they suddenly realise that they still haven't reached Glencoe and their intentions is to be on the road south. Then they turn up back at the ferry and they get very annoyed to be charged for coming back again. They think they ought to get back free, although it's been their own mistake going across here.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Perhaps they've been queuing for hours to get across?<br /> <br /> Oh yes. One man came back one night in a great state, about eleven o'clock, to the ferryman, knocked him up and said would he not get the boat out to take him across? And he was towing a caravan too. He could easily just stop at the roadside and spend the night in his caravan and cross first thing in the morning but he had gone about thirty-five miles before he realised he was on the wrong road.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Any other funny stories or things that's happened in the past?<br /> <br /> Oh well, there's plenty funny stories that I wouldn't like to repeat. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Let's have something without any names coming into it.<br /> <br /> Well, one man who had been imbibing a bit too much in the bar here, walked down to the ferry and didn't wait until the boat was right in and stepped off the jetty and landed in the water, between the boat and the jetty. And he had spent his money in vain; his quick dip in the water soon sobered him up! Another day somebody came along, got onto the boat and asked the ferrymen if that was the Cuillins on the other side and he couldn't be convinced that he wasn't crossing over to Skye. Just because it was a ferry, they all think that they're going over to Skye because I think this is the ferry they hear more about. Oh, I'm sure the ferrymen have plenty of laughs to tell