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TITLE
Grantown-on-Spey Summer Exhibition (4 of 7)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_BILLSADLER_04
PLACENAME
Grantown on Spey
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE: Cromdale, Inverallan and Advie
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Bill Sadler
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1845
KEYWORDS
museums
hunters and gatherers
audio

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Grantown Museum and Heritage Centre opened in 1999. It tells the story of Grantown-on-Spey, a fine example of an 18th-century planned town. In this audio extract from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair talks to Bill Sadler of the Grantown Society about a temporary exhibition of 'Old Grantown' in the Old Courthouse in Grantown, prior to the establishment of the museum.

This third part of the exhibition is the third part of our theme. It is the River Spey and the Spey acted in some ways like a magnet for the first settlers from Inverness or up the A9, if you like.

Interviewer: And then you've obviously got some of the old pine, Scots Pine roots here.

That's right these -

Interviewer: Taken from, from local forests?

Local peat bogs.

Interviewer: Yes.

They're in fact our oldest exhibits. They have been around for - they've been radio carbon dated these ones - and they are five thousand years old and they're quite fascinating because we're talking almost the same time as the first settlers came. And this particular piece of root here, which you can see, which is a lovely piece of wood, five thousand years old, but you can see on the edge there, that it's burnt -

Interviewer: Yes

- and so that was the, probably the death of that particular tree. It may have been lightning, it may well have been the first settlers who were, you know, chopping this down, build their house or whatever. And the incredible thing is that there we have their tools: an antler; a shoulder bone of an ox for a spade. And to create these enormous monuments was really something quite incredible, and the stone and the peat tell this story. The most interesting thing we've got to read here, in fact, is a piece of peat and if you can, as many people can, if you can read that peat, if you can see all the pollen counts and so on, you can, you know, it's - to the scientists that's a book

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Grantown-on-Spey Summer Exhibition (4 of 7)

MORAYSHIRE: Cromdale, Inverallan and Advie

1980s

museums; hunters and gatherers; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Grantown-on-Spey

Grantown Museum and Heritage Centre opened in 1999. It tells the story of Grantown-on-Spey, a fine example of an 18th-century planned town. In this audio extract from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair talks to Bill Sadler of the Grantown Society about a temporary exhibition of 'Old Grantown' in the Old Courthouse in Grantown, prior to the establishment of the museum. <br /> <br /> This third part of the exhibition is the third part of our theme. It is the River Spey and the Spey acted in some ways like a magnet for the first settlers from Inverness or up the A9, if you like.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And then you've obviously got some of the old pine, Scots Pine roots here.<br /> <br /> That's right these - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Taken from, from local forests?<br /> <br /> Local peat bogs.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> They're in fact our oldest exhibits. They have been around for - they've been radio carbon dated these ones - and they are five thousand years old and they're quite fascinating because we're talking almost the same time as the first settlers came. And this particular piece of root here, which you can see, which is a lovely piece of wood, five thousand years old, but you can see on the edge there, that it's burnt - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes<br /> <br /> - and so that was the, probably the death of that particular tree. It may have been lightning, it may well have been the first settlers who were, you know, chopping this down, build their house or whatever. And the incredible thing is that there we have their tools: an antler; a shoulder bone of an ox for a spade. And to create these enormous monuments was really something quite incredible, and the stone and the peat tell this story. The most interesting thing we've got to read here, in fact, is a piece of peat and if you can, as many people can, if you can read that peat, if you can see all the pollen counts and so on, you can, you know, it's - to the scientists that's a book <br />