Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
The Call of the Corncrake and Spotted Crake
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_BILLSINCLAIR
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Bill Sinclair
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1850
KEYWORDS
ornithology
bird watching
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair - bird watcher and recorder - talks about some of the birds to be seen in the Highlands, including the corncrake and the spotted crake.



This is one of my favourite recordings; it's of the corncrake and this one is craking. It's an adult, a male, calling right up in northwest Sutherland, at the end of May, again, and quite a nice wind blowing in. And you get the lambs calling in the she-, in the fields, and you hear also the moan of the power lines, you know the - All, all you want now is the peat, the smell of peat, but I can't give you that I'm afraid. [Laughter]. [Call of the corncrake].



Interviewer: In all the years that you've been observing birds have you seen many changes in the species, or the type of bird in the Highlands?



Yes, there's a lot of changes happening now. There's a lot of Arctic birds moving into the, into the north. We've got, we've got the wood sandpiper, Temminck's stint, snow buntings (there's more of these) and there was Lapland bunting breeding last year in Scotland. There's, there's a lot of new things and the spotted crake again. Now the spotted crake is one you're going to here now and this is another one that's just moving in. It's the same family as the corncrake. Listen to the difference in its call. [Call of the spotted crake].



Image Copyright - Sergey Yeliseev. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

The Call of the Corncrake and Spotted Crake

1980s; 1990s

ornithology; bird watching; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

In this audio extract, Bill Sinclair - bird watcher and recorder - talks about some of the birds to be seen in the Highlands, including the corncrake and the spotted crake.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> This is one of my favourite recordings; it's of the corncrake and this one is craking. It's an adult, a male, calling right up in northwest Sutherland, at the end of May, again, and quite a nice wind blowing in. And you get the lambs calling in the she-, in the fields, and you hear also the moan of the power lines, you know the - All, all you want now is the peat, the smell of peat, but I can't give you that I'm afraid. [Laughter]. [Call of the corncrake].<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: In all the years that you've been observing birds have you seen many changes in the species, or the type of bird in the Highlands?<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Yes, there's a lot of changes happening now. There's a lot of Arctic birds moving into the, into the north. We've got, we've got the wood sandpiper, Temminck's stint, snow buntings (there's more of these) and there was Lapland bunting breeding last year in Scotland. There's, there's a lot of new things and the spotted crake again. Now the spotted crake is one you're going to here now and this is another one that's just moving in. It's the same family as the corncrake. Listen to the difference in its call. [Call of the spotted crake].<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Image Copyright - Sergey Yeliseev. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.