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TITLE
Memories of the Black Isle Railway (10 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_BLACKISLERAIL_10
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1863
KEYWORDS
railways
railroads
trains
audio

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The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.

In this audio extract from the 1980s, a former Black Isle Railway porter recalls the advantages of living close to the railway.

'Well, as a matter of fact, many people went along the line with their buckets, picking up coal, oh yes. I mean, some of the tenders you'd see really full up to the top and very often if they were going with a fairly light train they'd be going fairly hard, and there was quite a lot falling off and many people were going along the line picking up bucketfuls of coal'

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Memories of the Black Isle Railway (10 of 16)

ROSS

1980s

railways; railroads; trains; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Black Isle Railway

The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the 1980s, a former Black Isle Railway porter recalls the advantages of living close to the railway.<br /> <br /> 'Well, as a matter of fact, many people went along the line with their buckets, picking up coal, oh yes. I mean, some of the tenders you'd see really full up to the top and very often if they were going with a fairly light train they'd be going fairly hard, and there was quite a lot falling off and many people were going along the line picking up bucketfuls of coal'