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TITLE
Conserving the corncrake (5 of 7)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_CORNCRAKE_05
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1877
KEYWORDS
ornithology
crofting
conservation
audio
RSPB

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Once common throughout Britain, in 1993 the corncrake was on the brink of extinction in Scotland with a mere 470 calling birds. The R.S.P.B.'s Corncrake Initiative, set up in 1993, makes payments available to crofters and farmers with corncrakes on their land to manage their hay or silage fields sensitively for the birds. Ten years on, the scheme has proved to be successful with a 73% increase overall in the number of calling males recorded. Today, corncrakes are confined largely to the Hebrides, with small populations in Orkney and the extreme north and west of mainland Scotland.

This audio recording was made prior to the Corncrake Initiative being set up. In it, a R.S.P.B. representative talks about the corncrake population in Europe.

Interviewer: Now, in Great Britain as a whole is the - Uist now the headquarters of corncrakes, the breeding population?

'It certainly is in Western Europe. The Irish population used to be very strong, but there's been a decline there and a push to the northwest as there has in the rest of the British Isles so that the northwest islands here, in the Western Isles, the Outer Hebrides, are now very much the stronghold, and elsewhere in Europe it's largely [a] coastal bird in Norway, in Sweden, the Baltic Islands, and around the Baltic coast. Very few in Holland, very few in France, and so on. In Eastern Europe there appear to be more of them but we know very little actually about the situation in parts of Russia.'

Image Copyright - Sergey Yeliseev. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

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Conserving the corncrake (5 of 7)

1980s

ornithology; crofting; conservation; audio; RSPB

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Conserving the Corncrake

Once common throughout Britain, in 1993 the corncrake was on the brink of extinction in Scotland with a mere 470 calling birds. The R.S.P.B.'s Corncrake Initiative, set up in 1993, makes payments available to crofters and farmers with corncrakes on their land to manage their hay or silage fields sensitively for the birds. Ten years on, the scheme has proved to be successful with a 73% increase overall in the number of calling males recorded. Today, corncrakes are confined largely to the Hebrides, with small populations in Orkney and the extreme north and west of mainland Scotland. <br /> <br /> This audio recording was made prior to the Corncrake Initiative being set up. In it, a R.S.P.B. representative talks about the corncrake population in Europe.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, in Great Britain as a whole is the - Uist now the headquarters of corncrakes, the breeding population? <br /> <br /> 'It certainly is in Western Europe. The Irish population used to be very strong, but there's been a decline there and a push to the northwest as there has in the rest of the British Isles so that the northwest islands here, in the Western Isles, the Outer Hebrides, are now very much the stronghold, and elsewhere in Europe it's largely [a] coastal bird in Norway, in Sweden, the Baltic Islands, and around the Baltic coast. Very few in Holland, very few in France, and so on. In Eastern Europe there appear to be more of them but we know very little actually about the situation in parts of Russia.'<br /> <br /> Image Copyright - Sergey Yeliseev. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.