Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Conserving the corncrake (6 of 7)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_CORNCRAKE_06
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1879
KEYWORDS
ornithology
crofting
conservation
audio
RSPB

Get Adobe Flash player

Once common throughout Britain, in 1993 the corncrake was on the brink of extinction in Scotland with a mere 470 calling birds. The R.S.P.B.'s Corncrake Initiative, set up in 1993, makes payments available to crofters and farmers with corncrakes on their land to manage their hay or silage fields sensitively for the birds. Ten years on, the scheme has proved to be successful with a 73% increase overall in the number of calling males recorded. Today, corncrakes are confined largely to the Hebrides, with small populations in Orkney and the extreme north and west of mainland Scotland.

This audio recording was made prior to the Corncrake Initiative being set up. In it, a R.S.P.B. representative talks about the fluctuating numbers.

Interviewer: Would you say the corncrake was increasing, or decreasing, or keeping at [a] very stable level?

'Here in the Uists they seem to be fairly stable; there's fluctuations from year to year. Last year appeared, in my small, relatively small study area, to be a good number; they were up by about 50% on the survey in 1983. But this year they're very late and we still haven't built up to those numbers of last year, but certainly there are worrying signs of declines very close to here. On Canna there's been a recent decline from, in the last four or five years, from about fifteen calling birds to two, last year, so that's a bit too close for comfort'

Image Copyright - Sergey Yeliseev. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Conserving the corncrake (6 of 7)

1980s

ornithology; crofting; conservation; audio; RSPB

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Conserving the Corncrake

Once common throughout Britain, in 1993 the corncrake was on the brink of extinction in Scotland with a mere 470 calling birds. The R.S.P.B.'s Corncrake Initiative, set up in 1993, makes payments available to crofters and farmers with corncrakes on their land to manage their hay or silage fields sensitively for the birds. Ten years on, the scheme has proved to be successful with a 73% increase overall in the number of calling males recorded. Today, corncrakes are confined largely to the Hebrides, with small populations in Orkney and the extreme north and west of mainland Scotland. <br /> <br /> This audio recording was made prior to the Corncrake Initiative being set up. In it, a R.S.P.B. representative talks about the fluctuating numbers.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Would you say the corncrake was increasing, or decreasing, or keeping at [a] very stable level?<br /> <br /> 'Here in the Uists they seem to be fairly stable; there's fluctuations from year to year. Last year appeared, in my small, relatively small study area, to be a good number; they were up by about 50% on the survey in 1983. But this year they're very late and we still haven't built up to those numbers of last year, but certainly there are worrying signs of declines very close to here. On Canna there's been a recent decline from, in the last four or five years, from about fifteen calling birds to two, last year, so that's a bit too close for comfort'<br /> <br /> Image Copyright - Sergey Yeliseev. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.