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TITLE
A Nature Walk in the Great Glen (1 of 4)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_DEREKMCGINN_01
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Derek McGinn
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1883
KEYWORDS
bird watching
ornithology
audio

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In this audio recording from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair chats to fellow amateur wildlife recordist Derek McGinn as they undertake a nature walk in the Great Glen in springtime.

It's a really pleasant, spring morning. The temperatures of yesterday which were rather low, Bill, have - seem to have climbed a little just like we're doing here. We're going up the side of a steep hill in - at the edge of a beech and oak woodland. We've come up a steep side and the sound around us is really beautiful. There's all sorts of little things I think to be heard around here. Like ourselves, the birds maybe feel it's spring again, and giving voice to that fact I can hear chaffinches, and great tits, and mistle thrush. I can see a little bird flitting around in the trees up there, and altogether it looks as if we'll have a pleasant walk this morning. One of the things I like about this particular location is that we've got this dell or den, I suppose we might call it, and because it's quite steep sided the trees have grown tall and straight. The tops of the trees are - some of them are almost level with the high ground on either side, and from the point of view of looking at the birds and so on, you can actually get up to their own level some of the time, and there really is a lot around here. Can you - can you look up there and see the little birds that are up in that tree there? I'm sure I can hear a -

Interviewer: Oh yes.

I'm sure I can hear a blue tit or some such.

Interviewer: Now, see this larch over here?

Yes, got you.

Interviewer: Just right above, above us. There's quite a lot of things flying round.

Oh Yes. Quite a bit of movement there.

Interviewer: Now, did I hear a chaffinch then?

Yes, you did. There's one very close to us.

Interviewer: Now, there it is. Can you see it?

Just over here somewhere, Bill. [Bird song]

Interviewer: Yes, it's a real sound that you hear in the woods at this time of the year, isn't it?

Yes. There are quite a number of chaffinches around. And they're one of these birds which have a song which they give just occasionally, or they sing and they stop, and one of the, one of the reasons for that is, we understand, is that the function of the song of the chaffinch is to let other male chaffinches know that he's around, so he sings and says, 'Here I am', and then he stops and listens to see if anyone else is challenging

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A Nature Walk in the Great Glen (1 of 4)

1980s

bird watching; ornithology; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Great Glen

In this audio recording from the 1980s, Bill Sinclair chats to fellow amateur wildlife recordist Derek McGinn as they undertake a nature walk in the Great Glen in springtime. <br /> <br /> It's a really pleasant, spring morning. The temperatures of yesterday which were rather low, Bill, have - seem to have climbed a little just like we're doing here. We're going up the side of a steep hill in - at the edge of a beech and oak woodland. We've come up a steep side and the sound around us is really beautiful. There's all sorts of little things I think to be heard around here. Like ourselves, the birds maybe feel it's spring again, and giving voice to that fact I can hear chaffinches, and great tits, and mistle thrush. I can see a little bird flitting around in the trees up there, and altogether it looks as if we'll have a pleasant walk this morning. One of the things I like about this particular location is that we've got this dell or den, I suppose we might call it, and because it's quite steep sided the trees have grown tall and straight. The tops of the trees are - some of them are almost level with the high ground on either side, and from the point of view of looking at the birds and so on, you can actually get up to their own level some of the time, and there really is a lot around here. Can you - can you look up there and see the little birds that are up in that tree there? I'm sure I can hear a - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes.<br /> <br /> I'm sure I can hear a blue tit or some such.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, see this larch over here?<br /> <br /> Yes, got you.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Just right above, above us. There's quite a lot of things flying round. <br /> <br /> Oh Yes. Quite a bit of movement there. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, did I hear a chaffinch then?<br /> <br /> Yes, you did. There's one very close to us.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now, there it is. Can you see it?<br /> <br /> Just over here somewhere, Bill. [Bird song]<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, it's a real sound that you hear in the woods at this time of the year, isn't it?<br /> <br /> Yes. There are quite a number of chaffinches around. And they're one of these birds which have a song which they give just occasionally, or they sing and they stop, and one of the, one of the reasons for that is, we understand, is that the function of the song of the chaffinch is to let other male chaffinches know that he's around, so he sings and says, 'Here I am', and then he stops and listens to see if anyone else is challenging