Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Crested Tits and Siskins in the Highlands
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_DESTHOMSON_05
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Desmond Nethersole-Thompson
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1901
KEYWORDS
ornithology
bird watching
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Desmond Nethersole-Thompson first came to the Highlands in 1932 to study birds. Following almost twenty years of study, mainly in the Spey Valley, he published his first account of the greenshank species. From 1964, he and his family lived each spring in a remote valley in Sutherland where they followed a population of greenshanks through many consecutive years. In this audio extract from 1980, Desmond describes the crested tit and siskin.

And in the same area, a little later in the season, I used to work and watch the crested tits; little excitable tit birds, white cheeks and erectile crest, and oh, delightfully, tame little chaps. They'd also, like crossbills, I've known them settle on my bonnet when I was watching at a nest. If you ever have the chance of finding and seeing a crested tit at the nest; the hen bores out, excavates a little hole in the dead stump and then makes a nest. But the thing to do is to watch the cock come in, call her off, or go into the hole, into the nest hole and feed her. Tremendously exciting things to see and it was the same too, with another little finch, the siskin. And the cock, a little green bird, black bonnet and bib, and the hen a more dowdy green. Very exciting birds to watch. Very difficult nest to find because they put their little nest right up in the canopy of the pines or conifers - larch and spruce - and then you have to find them. And the cock feeds the hen on the nest, comes in from perhaps a quarter of a mile off, perhaps a hundred yards off or so, flits through, flits through the foliage, lands on the nest, only for a second or two, and then he feeds her and he's off. And while that's happening the siskins talk to one another with a little querulous, chewing, call

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Crested Tits and Siskins in the Highlands

1980s; 1990s

ornithology; bird watching; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Bird Watching

Desmond Nethersole-Thompson first came to the Highlands in 1932 to study birds. Following almost twenty years of study, mainly in the Spey Valley, he published his first account of the greenshank species. From 1964, he and his family lived each spring in a remote valley in Sutherland where they followed a population of greenshanks through many consecutive years. In this audio extract from 1980, Desmond describes the crested tit and siskin.<br /> <br /> And in the same area, a little later in the season, I used to work and watch the crested tits; little excitable tit birds, white cheeks and erectile crest, and oh, delightfully, tame little chaps. They'd also, like crossbills, I've known them settle on my bonnet when I was watching at a nest. If you ever have the chance of finding and seeing a crested tit at the nest; the hen bores out, excavates a little hole in the dead stump and then makes a nest. But the thing to do is to watch the cock come in, call her off, or go into the hole, into the nest hole and feed her. Tremendously exciting things to see and it was the same too, with another little finch, the siskin. And the cock, a little green bird, black bonnet and bib, and the hen a more dowdy green. Very exciting birds to watch. Very difficult nest to find because they put their little nest right up in the canopy of the pines or conifers - larch and spruce - and then you have to find them. And the cock feeds the hen on the nest, comes in from perhaps a quarter of a mile off, perhaps a hundred yards off or so, flits through, flits through the foliage, lands on the nest, only for a second or two, and then he feeds her and he's off. And while that's happening the siskins talk to one another with a little querulous, chewing, call