Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Reindeer at Cairngorms (1 of 4 )
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ETHELLINDGREN_01
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Dr Ethel Lundgren
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1935
KEYWORDS
reindeer centres
Sami
Lapland
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.

In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren talks about the reindeers' initial journey to Scotland. (The photograph shows a group of reindeer with Mikel Utsi on the Cairngorm Mountains.)

These animals were loaded on a train at about the Arctic Circle latitude. They travelled to Narvik; were taken off into a lorry, in crates; loaded on one of the iron ore boats docking at Glasgow, on the Clyde, near Glasgow, after about four days, in seas, sometimes rough. Then lifted out again; put on lorries; taken in to quarantine for four weeks; put again in lorries and then finally released. There were no - No reindeer was lost; one was lost in quarantine near Edinburgh, for an infection, but not through accident and Mr. Utsi accompanied all of them. Naturally, we looked after them like fresh eggs. I mean, the first lot, I mean, if one of them coughed, we rushed to the vet. And the very fine veterinary service here, based here in Inverness, the County Veterinary Advisory Service, they were very kind, and used to meet us at the Station Hotel and we'd discuss diet and all sorts of things with them.

The leader of the herd, a fine ox, that is a gelded male, born on the slopes of Mount Sarek in Sweden, travelling across in an iron ore boat called 'Sarek', was therefore named Sarek. All the Scottish reindeer have names to this day, and Mr. Alan Smith [reindeer keeper] can, I believe, tell them all apart, or so he says

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Reindeer at Cairngorms (1 of 4 )

1980s; 1990s

reindeer centres; Sami; Lapland; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Deer

Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren talks about the reindeers' initial journey to Scotland. (The photograph shows a group of reindeer with Mikel Utsi on the Cairngorm Mountains.)<br /> <br /> These animals were loaded on a train at about the Arctic Circle latitude. They travelled to Narvik; were taken off into a lorry, in crates; loaded on one of the iron ore boats docking at Glasgow, on the Clyde, near Glasgow, after about four days, in seas, sometimes rough. Then lifted out again; put on lorries; taken in to quarantine for four weeks; put again in lorries and then finally released. There were no - No reindeer was lost; one was lost in quarantine near Edinburgh, for an infection, but not through accident and Mr. Utsi accompanied all of them. Naturally, we looked after them like fresh eggs. I mean, the first lot, I mean, if one of them coughed, we rushed to the vet. And the very fine veterinary service here, based here in Inverness, the County Veterinary Advisory Service, they were very kind, and used to meet us at the Station Hotel and we'd discuss diet and all sorts of things with them.<br /> <br /> The leader of the herd, a fine ox, that is a gelded male, born on the slopes of Mount Sarek in Sweden, travelling across in an iron ore boat called 'Sarek', was therefore named Sarek. All the Scottish reindeer have names to this day, and Mr. Alan Smith [reindeer keeper] can, I believe, tell them all apart, or so he says