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TITLE
Reindeer at Cairngorms (2 of 4)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ETHELLINDGREN_02
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Dr Ethel Lundgren
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1936
KEYWORDS
reindeer centres
Sami
Lapland
audio

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Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.

In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren talks about the early days of the project. (The photograph shows a group of reindeer with Mikel Utsi on the Cairngorm Mountains.)

This is the view from an old croft that we rented; had not been used for a long time. This was about a year and a half after the first ones landed. That is Mr. Utsi with a makeshift sled. Everything - Many things were makeshift; we did everything in the cheapest possible way in order that the funds should last out. This is the first time they were taken into a corral. The white ones are very attractive but they are slightly more delicate; they attract insects as well and are a little bit sleepy, on the sleepy side, but a great help to have a few light ones when you're trying to spot the herd on the hills. If the hills are without snow, that is.

That is the first cousin of Mr. Utsi's who came over for a year and three quarters to give things a start and when he inherited more reindeer on the death of his father he had to go back to Sweden. But these two were skiing around their ordinary business, in an unpretentious way, for two or three years here within sight of Aviemore, and many people think that had quite an effect on boosting the ski industry.

Now the reindeers, the way to make them tamer, were taught to eat a well known brand of bread, which we no longer put in our literature, but it's here in the film, in order to, easily to attract them. It was quite effective. Well, at this - on this occasion, Mr. Utsi suddenly found there were parasites in the hair. He'd never seen anything like this before because reindeer are very, well, clean animals and they keep away from any infection. And we started using a routine item prescribed actually by the Ministry of Agriculture and this was much too severe, so we spent a couple of years experimenting until we got an insect repellent, in cooperation with a Scottish firm, MacDougall and Robertson, and that has really dealt with our problem since 1955 but we had some losses before

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Reindeer at Cairngorms (2 of 4)

1980s; 1990s

reindeer centres; Sami; Lapland; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Deer

Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren talks about the early days of the project. (The photograph shows a group of reindeer with Mikel Utsi on the Cairngorm Mountains.)<br /> <br /> This is the view from an old croft that we rented; had not been used for a long time. This was about a year and a half after the first ones landed. That is Mr. Utsi with a makeshift sled. Everything - Many things were makeshift; we did everything in the cheapest possible way in order that the funds should last out. This is the first time they were taken into a corral. The white ones are very attractive but they are slightly more delicate; they attract insects as well and are a little bit sleepy, on the sleepy side, but a great help to have a few light ones when you're trying to spot the herd on the hills. If the hills are without snow, that is. <br /> <br /> That is the first cousin of Mr. Utsi's who came over for a year and three quarters to give things a start and when he inherited more reindeer on the death of his father he had to go back to Sweden. But these two were skiing around their ordinary business, in an unpretentious way, for two or three years here within sight of Aviemore, and many people think that had quite an effect on boosting the ski industry. <br /> <br /> Now the reindeers, the way to make them tamer, were taught to eat a well known brand of bread, which we no longer put in our literature, but it's here in the film, in order to, easily to attract them. It was quite effective. Well, at this - on this occasion, Mr. Utsi suddenly found there were parasites in the hair. He'd never seen anything like this before because reindeer are very, well, clean animals and they keep away from any infection. And we started using a routine item prescribed actually by the Ministry of Agriculture and this was much too severe, so we spent a couple of years experimenting until we got an insect repellent, in cooperation with a Scottish firm, MacDougall and Robertson, and that has really dealt with our problem since 1955 but we had some losses before