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TITLE
Reindeer at Cairngorms (3 of 4 )
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ETHELLINDGREN_03
PERIOD
1980s; 1990s
CREATOR
Dr Ethel Lundgren
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1938
KEYWORDS
reindeer centres
Sami
Lapland
audio

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Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.

In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren talks about the difficulties of spotting the reindeer on the hills. (The photograph shows 'Vikta', one of the bull reindeer on the Cairngorm Mountains.)

I think you'll notice they tone in with the background - this is also true on the hill - more than the red deer. In other words, the red deer are more conspicuous. Reindeer are very hard to spot because of the grey in the brown. One time the keeper was ill and away for a period, Mr. Utsi hired this helicopter and in the course of three quarters of an hour spotted three or four groups of reindeer; it was very successful. And - but that was when there was snow on the ground. And again he hired, by that time a much more expensive helicopter, and although he knew where they were, roughly, could not see one single one from the helicopter; they toned in so much with the heather and bracken and so on. One is often asked what they eat; in spring, when the green grass comes up, they're very interested in it, and for a time, but you can, if you have the patience, walking with them, and see that here's some grass and some lichen beside, and almost always they'll choose the lichen even if it's dry.

At this point in July they're changing their coats and we used not to allow the press to get anywhere near them because they thought they were moth eaten and there was a scare once with one of the societies in animal welfare

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Reindeer at Cairngorms (3 of 4 )

1980s; 1990s

reindeer centres; Sami; Lapland; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Deer

Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren talks about the difficulties of spotting the reindeer on the hills. (The photograph shows 'Vikta', one of the bull reindeer on the Cairngorm Mountains.)<br /> <br /> I think you'll notice they tone in with the background - this is also true on the hill - more than the red deer. In other words, the red deer are more conspicuous. Reindeer are very hard to spot because of the grey in the brown. One time the keeper was ill and away for a period, Mr. Utsi hired this helicopter and in the course of three quarters of an hour spotted three or four groups of reindeer; it was very successful. And - but that was when there was snow on the ground. And again he hired, by that time a much more expensive helicopter, and although he knew where they were, roughly, could not see one single one from the helicopter; they toned in so much with the heather and bracken and so on. One is often asked what they eat; in spring, when the green grass comes up, they're very interested in it, and for a time, but you can, if you have the patience, walking with them, and see that here's some grass and some lichen beside, and almost always they'll choose the lichen even if it's dry. <br /> <br /> At this point in July they're changing their coats and we used not to allow the press to get anywhere near them because they thought they were moth eaten and there was a scare once with one of the societies in animal welfare