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TITLE
Reindeer at Cairngorms (4 of 4)
EXTERNAL ID
GB1796_SINCLAIR_ETHELLINDGREN_04
DATE OF RECORDING
1980
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Dr Ethel Lundgren
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
1939
KEYWORDS
reindeer centres
Sami
Lapland
audio

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Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.

In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren gives details of the film. (The photograph shows Edwin Wakeling, herdsman, with a reindeer calf.)

The next film is about three years later, two to three years later, and there are four specific parts to it. The first one shows you Sarek being ridden by the son of Colonel Rolly who's a great Arctic expert in the Canadian government. And we have done very little of this - there's all sorts of lines we've not evolved because it's not possible to have more than one full-time member of staff and so on. Also, it's not this breed of reindeer, it's not suitable for our sort of adult. I mean it's a teenager or a light adult, but in Siberia there's a larger breed and the tribe that I studied had no sleds and no other form of transport than riding and packing reindeer. And the second part of this film shows a reindeer being packed and going up Cairn Lochan, by Lurcher's Gulley. And then the third shows a Highland evening - animals, the first ones that we were breeding there with big antlers. It was very exciting. And finally, the last, showing you how they, how they dig for their [food]

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Reindeer at Cairngorms (4 of 4)

1980s

reindeer centres; Sami; Lapland; audio

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Bill Sinclair Audio: Deer

Swedish reindeer herder, Mikel Utsi, was responsible for re-introducing reindeer into the Cairngorm Mountains back in 1952. He was supported in his efforts by his wife, Dr. Ethel Lindgren. Starting from only a few animals, the herd grew over the years and is currently maintained at around 130 to 150. Visitors can take a guided tour to view the main herd on the hills. Alternatively, a few of the reindeer can be seen at the centre at Glenmore, near Aviemore.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract, recorded during a short film presentation in Inverness around 1980, Dr. Ethel Lindgren gives details of the film. (The photograph shows Edwin Wakeling, herdsman, with a reindeer calf.)<br /> <br /> The next film is about three years later, two to three years later, and there are four specific parts to it. The first one shows you Sarek being ridden by the son of Colonel Rolly who's a great Arctic expert in the Canadian government. And we have done very little of this - there's all sorts of lines we've not evolved because it's not possible to have more than one full-time member of staff and so on. Also, it's not this breed of reindeer, it's not suitable for our sort of adult. I mean it's a teenager or a light adult, but in Siberia there's a larger breed and the tribe that I studied had no sleds and no other form of transport than riding and packing reindeer. And the second part of this film shows a reindeer being packed and going up Cairn Lochan, by Lurcher's Gulley. And then the third shows a Highland evening - animals, the first ones that we were breeding there with big antlers. It was very exciting. And finally, the last, showing you how they, how they dig for their [food]