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TITLE
Ferry at Ballachulish
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_HF_16_4_027
PLACENAME
Ballachulish
DISTRICT
North Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
19585
KEYWORDS
ferries
boats
quarries
vehicles
Ferry at Ballachulish

This photograph shows two ferry boats nearing the slipway on the north side of the crossing at Ballachulish sometime in the early 20th century.

As there was no road around the head of Loch Leven until 1927, the ferry provided an important crossing. The strong currents, tides and size of ferry boat dictated when the crossings could be made. This resulted in shelters and inns being established to provide accommodation for passengers who were waiting to cross.



Over the years different types of ferry boats have been used. Those shown here are wide, flat bottomed boats. Vehicles would be driven on over planks laid out on the slipway. With the vehicle secured, the ferrymen would rotate the turntable so the vehicle could be driven forward, rather than reversed off, at the other slipway. Larger ferries were gradually introduced until, in 1975, they were replaced by the Ballachulish Bridge.

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Ferry at Ballachulish

ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin

1930s

ferries; boats; quarries; vehicles

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum Photographic Collection

This photograph shows two ferry boats nearing the slipway on the north side of the crossing at Ballachulish sometime in the early 20th century.<br /> <br /> As there was no road around the head of Loch Leven until 1927, the ferry provided an important crossing. The strong currents, tides and size of ferry boat dictated when the crossings could be made. This resulted in shelters and inns being established to provide accommodation for passengers who were waiting to cross. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Over the years different types of ferry boats have been used. Those shown here are wide, flat bottomed boats. Vehicles would be driven on over planks laid out on the slipway. With the vehicle secured, the ferrymen would rotate the turntable so the vehicle could be driven forward, rather than reversed off, at the other slipway. Larger ferries were gradually introduced until, in 1975, they were replaced by the Ballachulish Bridge.