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TITLE
Equipt for a Northern Visit
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_ODA_64
DATE OF IMAGE
7 August 1822
PERIOD
1820s
CREATOR
Charles Williams
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
19790
KEYWORDS
satire
equipped
cartoons
engravings
tourismed
Equipt for a Northern Visit

This political cartoon by Charles Williams was published in London on 7 August 1822 by J Johnston of 98 Cheapside. It is captioned at the foot of the page: Equipt for a Northern Visit - 'Folly as it grows in years, the more extravagant appears'.

The cartoon satirises the visit of George IV to Edinburgh in 1822. Both the King and the Lord Mayor of London, Sir William Curtis, seen here, wore the kilt. Wearing tartan was banned after the Battle of Culloden and so the visit was an important step in making it acceptable once again.

The visit was organised by Sir Walter Scott, whose novels and poems had created considerable interest in Scottish history and culture

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Equipt for a Northern Visit

1820s

satire; equipped; cartoons; engravings; tourismed

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum (illustrations)

This political cartoon by Charles Williams was published in London on 7 August 1822 by J Johnston of 98 Cheapside. It is captioned at the foot of the page: Equipt for a Northern Visit - 'Folly as it grows in years, the more extravagant appears'.<br /> <br /> The cartoon satirises the visit of George IV to Edinburgh in 1822. Both the King and the Lord Mayor of London, Sir William Curtis, seen here, wore the kilt. Wearing tartan was banned after the Battle of Culloden and so the visit was an important step in making it acceptable once again. <br /> <br /> The visit was organised by Sir Walter Scott, whose novels and poems had created considerable interest in Scottish history and culture