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TITLE
Dunrobin Castle station, 1997
EXTERNAL ID
NRM_NBNW_FNL_DS080530
PLACENAME
Dunrobin Station
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Golspie
DATE OF IMAGE
November 1997
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Lynn Patrick
SOURCE
National Railway Museum, York
ASSET ID
19855
KEYWORDS
railway
railways
stations
Dunrobin Castle station, 1997

Dunrobin Castle station was photographed in November 1997 with its rustic station building and island platform.

This station was opened in 1870, built for the exclusive use of the Dukes of Sutherland. The present station building, built for the 4th Duke in 1902 by the architect L. Bisset, is black and white half-timbered in Cheshire style, with a platform canopy composed of trees with rustic gables supported on tree trunks. The station was opened to the public on the nationalisation of the railways in 1948 and was closed by Beeching in 1965, but re-opened on 30 June 1985. It has been known as Dunrobin, Dunrobin Castle and Dunrobin Halt.

Today, the station island platform remains, but the wooden carriage shed that once housed the Duke of Sutherland's private railway coach, no longer stands. The rustic-style station building has undergone major restoration, and today houses a small museum of railway memorabilia.

While many Victorian peers built private waiting rooms at local stations, and often had the right to stop trains, the Dukes of Sutherland not only had their own station, but also an engine shed, tank engine and two private coaches. The engine was housed at Golspie and the coaches at Dunrobin. One of these coaches is now in the National Railway Museum collection. Up until 1948, when their train arrived at Inverness, the coaches were attached to a main line train and taken to their estates in Staffordshire and London.

The 3rd Duke was a railway enthusiast and drove the tank engine himself. He had an upholstered seat in front of the coal bunker for any passengers who wanted to join him on the footplate. The Highland line stopped short of his estates, so the Duke built sixteen miles of track from Golspie to Helmsdale at his own expense.

Background
Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.

'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.

We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:

Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.

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Dunrobin Castle station, 1997

SUTHERLAND: Golspie

1990s

railway; railways; stations

National Railway Museum, York

North by Northwest - The Far North Line

Dunrobin Castle station was photographed in November 1997 with its rustic station building and island platform. <br /> <br /> This station was opened in 1870, built for the exclusive use of the Dukes of Sutherland. The present station building, built for the 4th Duke in 1902 by the architect L. Bisset, is black and white half-timbered in Cheshire style, with a platform canopy composed of trees with rustic gables supported on tree trunks. The station was opened to the public on the nationalisation of the railways in 1948 and was closed by Beeching in 1965, but re-opened on 30 June 1985. It has been known as Dunrobin, Dunrobin Castle and Dunrobin Halt. <br /> <br /> Today, the station island platform remains, but the wooden carriage shed that once housed the Duke of Sutherland's private railway coach, no longer stands. The rustic-style station building has undergone major restoration, and today houses a small museum of railway memorabilia. <br /> <br /> While many Victorian peers built private waiting rooms at local stations, and often had the right to stop trains, the Dukes of Sutherland not only had their own station, but also an engine shed, tank engine and two private coaches. The engine was housed at Golspie and the coaches at Dunrobin. One of these coaches is now in the National Railway Museum collection. Up until 1948, when their train arrived at Inverness, the coaches were attached to a main line train and taken to their estates in Staffordshire and London.<br /> <br /> The 3rd Duke was a railway enthusiast and drove the tank engine himself. He had an upholstered seat in front of the coal bunker for any passengers who wanted to join him on the footplate. The Highland line stopped short of his estates, so the Duke built sixteen miles of track from Golspie to Helmsdale at his own expense.<br /> <br /> Background<br /> Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.<br /> <br /> 'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.<br /> <br /> We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:<br /> <br /> Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.