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TITLE
The station at Mound, 2001
EXTERNAL ID
NRM_NBNW_FNL_DS080533
PLACENAME
The Mound
DISTRICT
Dornoch and Creich
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Dornoch
DATE OF IMAGE
January 2001
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Lynn Patrick
SOURCE
National Railway Museum, York
ASSET ID
19858
KEYWORDS
railway
railways
stations
The station at Mound, 2001

The station at Mound, photographed in January 2001, was the junction for the branch line to Dornoch operated by the Dornoch Light Railway. The station opened on 13 April 1868 and closed on 13 June 1960. The station consisted of two platforms (one on the main line and one on the branch line), and a loop on both routes. Part of the station buildings still stand, but the Mound Junction signal box has been demolished.

The first sod of the Dornoch Light Railway was cut on 15 May 1900 and it opened to traffic on 2 June 1902. It was opened by a group of Dornoch businessmen. It was a branch line which connected Dornoch to the main Highland Railway some 11km (7 miles) away at the Mound. Two years later the Station Hotel (now called the Dornoch Hotel) was opened with 60 stylish rooms and all the latest facilities. For the next 30 years this upmarket hotel was a magnet for wealthy tourists.

For many local people the Dornoch Light Railway was a gateway to the rest of the world. For the first time in history travel was relatively easy and affordable. Fishworkers from Embo could buy return tickets to the herring ports of England and earn money to send home, and the parish's young people could travel easily to universities in the cities.

By the 1950s car ownership became the norm and rail travel declined. Dornoch's Light Railway was deemed unprofitable and it closed to traffic in 1960.

Background
Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.

'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.

We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:

Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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The station at Mound, 2001

SUTHERLAND: Dornoch

2000s

railway; railways; stations

National Railway Museum, York

North by Northwest - The Far North Line

The station at Mound, photographed in January 2001, was the junction for the branch line to Dornoch operated by the Dornoch Light Railway. The station opened on 13 April 1868 and closed on 13 June 1960. The station consisted of two platforms (one on the main line and one on the branch line), and a loop on both routes. Part of the station buildings still stand, but the Mound Junction signal box has been demolished.<br /> <br /> The first sod of the Dornoch Light Railway was cut on 15 May 1900 and it opened to traffic on 2 June 1902. It was opened by a group of Dornoch businessmen. It was a branch line which connected Dornoch to the main Highland Railway some 11km (7 miles) away at the Mound. Two years later the Station Hotel (now called the Dornoch Hotel) was opened with 60 stylish rooms and all the latest facilities. For the next 30 years this upmarket hotel was a magnet for wealthy tourists.<br /> <br /> For many local people the Dornoch Light Railway was a gateway to the rest of the world. For the first time in history travel was relatively easy and affordable. Fishworkers from Embo could buy return tickets to the herring ports of England and earn money to send home, and the parish's young people could travel easily to universities in the cities.<br /> <br /> By the 1950s car ownership became the norm and rail travel declined. Dornoch's Light Railway was deemed unprofitable and it closed to traffic in 1960.<br /> <br /> Background<br /> Over one hundred years ago, two of the most picturesque railways in the world, the Kyle line and the Far North line, were built. Linking them to the rest of the UK rail network is the Highland main line. From 1997 to 2003 the National Railway Museum photographed these three lines, and from the images three exhibitions were created - 'Connection to the Kyle', 'By Firth and Flow' and 'The Highland Link'. The exhibitions were hosted on the Scottish Archive Network (SCAN) under the digital exhibition 'North by Northwest' which officially launched the National Archive of Scotland site on 5 June 2001 in Inverness. The collaboration with SCAN lasted until 2009 when 'North by Northwest' was transferred to the Am Baile website.<br /> <br /> 'North by Northwest' documents living history and records a snapshot of time in the lives of the people and the lines during the closing years of the twentieth century and the emergence of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions celebrated the impact of the Highland railways on the people, landscape and economy of the Scottish Highlands.<br /> <br /> We acknowledge support from the following sponsors who funded the photographic survey of the Highland main line, the Kyle and the Far North lines by the National Railway Museum photographers between 1997 and 2003:<br /> <br /> Railtrack, Railtrack-Scotland, ScotRail, EWS, Porterbrook, First Engineering, The Highland Rail Network Development Partnership, The Highland Council, Ross & Cromarty Enterprise, Caithness & Sutherland Enterprise, Safeways, Friends of the National Railway Museum, Perth & Kinross Council, and the Highland Railway Society.